Air Commodore Jack Haines

The Scotsman, December 22, 2017 | Go to article overview

Air Commodore Jack Haines


Air Commodore Jack Haines RAF (Retd) OBE DL. Born 17 October 1945 in Gravesend, Kent. Died: 12 December 2017 in Fife, aged 72.

Air Commodore Jack Haines has died after a long illness. He was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease 13 years ago.

Born in Gravesend, Kent, he was educated at Sir Roger Manwood's School, Sandwich, Kent where he gained many sports colours in track events, rugby and cricket. He was commissioned into the Royal Air Force in July 1964, where he served for 38 years as a navigator flying fast jet aircraft.

He began his flying career at RAF Leuchars in 1965 where he trained to fly the Javelin before serving on No 64 Squadron at RAF Tengah in Singapore until May 1967. He was then selected for an exchange tour with the Royal Navy, during which he flew Sea Vixens with 892 and 899 Naval Air Squadrons on HMS Hermes and HMS Eagle respectively.

He returned to Leuchars in 1969 on 43 Squadron and began his long association with the much respected Phantom F4. He left Leuchars in 1972 for an exchange tour with the United States Marine Corps in Beaufort, South Carolina. Promoted to Squadron Leader on his return in 1975, he served as the Navigational Radar leader on 23 Squadron at RAF Wattisham until he left the cockpit environment early in 1979 for another exchange tour with the Royal Navy as the Royal Air Force Staff Officer to the Flag Officer. The post involved several months away a sea.

He attended Staff College in 1981 and then, after "flying" the Phantom desk at Headquarters Strike Command, was delighted to return to the front line again at RAF Leuchars in early 1984 as Officer Commanding Operations Wing, a role he held for three years.

Leaving Leuchars at the end of 1987, he then entered the Nato Forum and served in the Operations Division at The Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe (Shape) in Belgium for another three years. On promotion to Group Captain he returned to East Anglia to command RAF Neatishead until 1993, when he returned to Nato Headquarters in Brussels as part of the International Military Staff. He was engaged exclusively in the political/military aspects of Nato's involvement in the tragedy in Bosnia Herzegovina.

Promotion after this tour at the end of 1995 brought the new Air Commodore back to Leuchars for the fourth time to a dual role of Commanding the Station and also the Air Officer Scotland and Northern Ireland. The Tornado fighter had replaced the Phantom and he became fully operational in this new fighter aged 50. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Air Commodore Jack Haines
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.