Getting Rid of Party Politics Could Create a Democratic Revolution

By Monteith, Brian | The Scotsman, December 26, 2017 | Go to article overview

Getting Rid of Party Politics Could Create a Democratic Revolution


Monteith, Brian, The Scotsman


A nother Christmas is over and so we hurtle to the end of this year, it having been only slightly less calamitous than the one before.

In 2016 we had the deaths of an extraordinary number of famous people that had shaped the previous century; Hibs won the Scottish Cup; the SNP lost its majority at Holyrood while Labour came third behind the Tories; we voted to leave the EU; and, the United States elected Trump as its next President. That train of events was always going to be hard to beat for drama and history but 2017 gave it a run for its money; the Brexit process started with Article 50 being invoked in March; the SNP decline continued, this time at the local council elections; Theresa May called an early general election and lost a 20-point lead and her overall majority; the SNP lost 21 MPs while the Tories became the largest Unionist party in Scotland for the first time since 1955 with 13 MPs; Scottish Labour had to elect its fourth leader in three years; Celtic racked-up an unbeaten run of 69 domestic games; and, the SNP broke its manifesto pledge by announcing an increase of income tax for those earning over £26,000.

Now 2018 promises to be just as much a rollercoaster ride; despite suppressing Isis in Syria the domestic threat from terrorism still hangs over us; despite "austerity" we continue to increase public spending and pile on the national debt that will have to be paid for by our grandchildren - and the Brexit process continues to drag on while the UK Government hangs on by its fingernails. The British economy remains an enigma. Along with the best unemployment figures since the mid-seventies and record manufacturing orders for 30 years, there is slowing GDP growth, unresponsive productivity levels and pressure on disposable income - although the statistics for the latter two measures are now increasingly unreliable. Housing has at last been recognised as a serious problem across the whole country and in Scotland public education shows little sign of reversing its scandalous decline in standards, while the NHS looks fit to burst.

Yet when we look to our politicians to tackle the challenges we face we are continually given fine words with little delivery. So many promises have been broken and so many commitments betrayed - all delivered with the usual divisive tribalism of party politics that circulates blame like pass the parcel.

You can tell people are sick and tired of this political charade because every so often there is the cry that we need a new party to put things right. It is a cry for help but it would be as much use as throwing a marble lifebelt to a drowning man. How many political parties do you think there are in the United Kingdom, eight, maybe a dozen, maybe two-dozen? Actually the Electoral Commission lists 314, including a number of new additions this year.

The big parties are decidedly in control and will remain so unless there is a major schism in Labour or the Conservatives that involves sitting MPs forming a new block at Westminster. Until that happens the media will simply not give any attention to new parties forming from the ground up, for it sees their advocates as cranks on the margins of reason. …

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