Census Questions Only Divide Us

By Connerly, Ward; Gonzalez, Mike | The Spokesman-Review (Spokane, WA), January 5, 2018 | Go to article overview

Census Questions Only Divide Us


Connerly, Ward, Gonzalez, Mike, The Spokesman-Review (Spokane, WA)


The American people are dangerously divided, but one event looming on the horizon has the potential to put us on a path toward unity: the U.S. census.

If President Donald Trump makes no changes, the U.S. Census Bureau in 2020 will again seek to shoehorn some 330 million Americans into official racial and ethnic categories. This system doesn't just ignore science. It also completely overlooks a burgeoning "mixed-race" population that resents arbitrary racial straitjackets.

Why this unnecessary division? Because for four decades our government has been engaged in the unsavory practice of designating official groups, and standing against any reform is a coalition of special-interest liberal organizations that depend on it for funds and prestige.

Changing this status quo is therefore a fight Trump should relish. If he doesn't, the United States will continue its present evolution from a nation-state into a "state of nations" - something more akin to the Ottoman Empire, where people were stratified legally based on ethnicity and religion.

The president has the power to change the census. Many Americans believe the division into five ethnicities - white, black, Hispanic, Asian and Native American - has been around for as long as we've been collecting census data. Not so. The system goes back only to 1977, when the Office of Management and Budget issued Statistical Policy Directive No. 15.

The groups were then jammed into the 1980 Census, with no input from voters. Science also didn't get a vote: Bureaucrats conjured up pan-ethnic groups such as "Hispanics" and "Asians" with no basis in anthropology, biology or culture. Today, this regime stands behind the identity-consciousness that is tearing the nation apart. Obviously, we need another approach.

The Trump administration wants to change the census by asking a question on citizenship. Though important and with historical precedent, that modification doesn't go far enough. A more valuable reform would include getting rid of the official categories and asking simple national-origin questions ("Are your ancestors from Ecuador, Germany, Japan? Check as many boxes as apply.") and, perhaps, questions on races identified by anthropologists - not bureaucrats.

But even these are too reductionist. Today, you can spit into a vial, send it to genomics companies and discover that you are not "Irish," as you thought, but instead 60 percent English. Or you could be roughly 30 percent German, 45 percent Slavic, 15 percent Native American and 10 percent Bantu. The census's official categories ignore this rich diversity.

Of late, mixed-race Americans who balk at being straitjacketed have gained a high-profile defender: Meghan Markle, the American engaged to Britain's Prince Harry. …

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