The History Offarming Thispopular Fruitis Just Bananas

By Mihm, Steven | Winnipeg Free Press, January 10, 2018 | Go to article overview

The History Offarming Thispopular Fruitis Just Bananas


Mihm, Steven, Winnipeg Free Press


The bananapocalypse is coming. That’s the likelihood that sometime in the next decade, bananas may disappear, victims of a fungal pathogen known as Panama Disease. The disease is on the march throughout the world, threatening the future of one of the world’s most popular fruits.

Panama Disease may be the cause of this disaster, but it’s also a symptom of a bigger problem afflicting global agriculture: a failure to diversify. For the past couple of centuries, the tendency has been to adopt a single reputable cultivar and — literally — bet the farm on it.

The most devastating case study in the dangers of monoculture comes from Ireland in the 1840s. After the discovery of potatoes in the New World, the Irish began cultivating them en masse. But while the Incas and other peoples had cultivated thousands of varieties of potatoes, the Irish grew only three kinds, mostly a homely variety known as the Lumper.

This particular potato proved remarkably productive. But it was vulnerable to a fungal pathogen known as Phytophthora infestans, better known as potato blight. In 1845, the organism destroyed that year’s crop of Lumpers, then raged across the rest of Europe. It’s estimated that a million people died of starvation in Ireland alone, with another two million people emigrating out of desperation.

Despite this object lesson in the dangers of monoculture, farmers planting crops often favoured a handful of trusted varieties.

So it was with the banana. Though bananas come in hundreds of shapes, sizes, colours and flavour profiles, a single cultivar became the fruit of the masses in the late 19th century: the Gros Michel banana, otherwise known as Big Mike. This particular breed, which originated in Southeast Asia, became a star commercial crop.

Big Mike had a lot going for it: enormous bunches of tasty, sweet bananas, resistance to bruising and an ability to stay fresh even when thrown in the sweltering hold of a ship. The big banana companies like United Fruit planted Gros Michel on sprawling plantations throughout Latin America and the Caribbean.

Like most edible bananas, Big Mike was sterile and growers propagated it by taking a cutting that would become the basis of a new plant.

Each banana plantation, then, was populated not only with a single variety of banana, but with bananas that had the exact same genetic material as one another. …

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