Humour Based Intervention Program (HBIP): A Pilot Study

By John, Malamelputhenpurayil Mini; Tungol, Joy | Indian Journal of Positive Psychology, December 2017 | Go to article overview

Humour Based Intervention Program (HBIP): A Pilot Study


John, Malamelputhenpurayil Mini, Tungol, Joy, Indian Journal of Positive Psychology


The transition from middle to old age encompasses a multitude of changes and losses on physical, psychological, and social levels that enforce considerable pressure on the individual's structure of self and personal continuity especially in later life. By 2020, it will be the first time in history, that the number of people over 60 years old will be higher than that of children up to 5 years old (WHO, 2015). Unfortunately, the increasing number of older adults has not been accompanied by an increase in public services ready to take care of them (WHO, 2015). Furthermore, the problems become more intricate when the children start neglecting and deserting their aged ones and the older adults face psycho-social and emotional problems associated with their day to day life situation. Due to the changes in the family structure and modernization, elderly population is facing inevitable challenges to live their life respectfully (Rahman, 2009). During the transition period of old age, the older adults tend to have psychological changes like slowdown of thinking, loss of memory, decrease in enthusiasm and alternation of sleep pattem in their daily life. Social pressure and inadequate resources create many dysfunctional features of old age. Reduced health, reduced income, and a sudden break with particular kind of professional life result to in psychological problems for the retired people (Amirun, 2013). Attitude towards old age, degradation of status in the community, problems of isolation, loneliness, emptiness, economic uncertainty, generation gap, distress and despair are the predominant thrust areas resulting in psychological frustration among the aged. These feeling pushed them into the abyss of depression (Bahrami & Ramezani, 2009).

Depression in elderly is similar to those associated with younger people and include poverty, poor health, lack of social involvement, being single, divorced, widowed, disability, lose events such as the death of a spouse, unwanted feelings and low social support (Newman & Newman, 2012). This predicament of elderly is augmented by the possible negligence they often experience at the hands of their own family members more especially by their children. This inflicts excruciating pain in their lives. Most of, their physical and psychological needs are neglected, they feel abandoned by those whom they spent the quality years of their life, and this pain of being disregarded is far more hurting than the physical ailments and incapacities (Deswal, 2011). Happiness depends on a lot of factors such as position in the society, social situations, relationships with others, self-worth and financial security, physical and psychological well-being and so on (Lena et al., 2010). Developmental growth in this stage can be under way if the individual adapts to variations and losses through practicality and flexibility and spends the last years of his or her life with a sense of self-worth. The researchers intended to develop an intervention program to help this desolate section of our human family by alleviating their depression and the allied symptoms and enhancing the level of their happiness through a proposed Humor-based intervention program.

Promoting satisfaction and well-being among elderly is a challenging task. An exploration of effective intervention identified that humor therapeutic techniques can enhance mental, physical, and psychological health (Lai & Chonga, 2010). Humor therapy reduces anxiety, tension, stress, depression, and loneliness. It also increases self-esteem, hope, energy, control emotions, cheerfulness and life satisfaction (Hirsch, Junglas, & Konradt, 2010). Also it supports social, emotional, and psychological state in difficult times, such as life crisis or grief of in late adulthood (Hirsch, Junglas, & Konradt, 2010). Some research evidences suggest that older adults tend to use humor as a coping mechanism more often than the younger population. A sense of humor stimulates social bonds, and puts others at ease through telling jokes, saying funny things, laughing with others, and not taking oneself too seriously (Greengross & Miller, 2011) and decreases levels of chronic pain and loneliness, along with increases levels of happiness. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Humour Based Intervention Program (HBIP): A Pilot Study
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.