Intelligence, Electronic Warfare and Sensors

Army, October 2017 | Go to article overview

Intelligence, Electronic Warfare and Sensors


The Program Executive Office for Intelligence, Electronic Warfare and Sensors is made up of five project managers dedicated to designing, delivering and sustaining advanced technologies to give soldiers the decisive edge.

The office, known as PEO IEW&S, develops and integrates sensors and sensor data across technologies, ensuring that warfighters have a complete understanding of the battlefield. PEO IEW&S is responsible for a combination of more than 100 programs of record and quick-reaction capabilities. By providing sensors, radars, intelligence collection and dissemination equipment, soldiers are given a complete picture of the battlespace.

Representative programs within the office include the Electronic Warfare Planning and Management Tool, the Enhanced Medium Altitude Reconnaissance and Surveillance System, and the Common Infrared Countermeasures system.

Electronic Warfare Planning Management Tool

As its name implies, the new Electronic Warfare Planning Management Tool is a tool for the electronic warfare officer to plan and manage electronic warfare capabilities within the Army. It facilitates the seamless integration of the electronic warfare officer into the military decision-making process.

According to Lt. Col. Marc Dorrer, U.S. Army product manager for electronic warfare integration, it marks the first time that the electronic warfare officer will have a specialized tool he or she can integrate into that military decisionmaking process and influence a commander's decision.

The program focuses on four "capability drops" within the first increment of the Electronic Warfare Planning and Management Tool. Initial drops will introduce the system on a server design, but plans for the third drop project are to move it to a laptop computer.

In terms of capabilities, the initial drop includes modeling, simulating, planning and anticipating different electronic warfare effects-whether friendly, foe or gray-and integrating the electronic warfare officer into the military decision-making process.

The configuration has reached initial operational capability and has been fielded to an Army training site and a brigade.

The initial program intent was to limit the initial drop to those two locations and then incrementally provide expanded capabilities while using those locations to provide a continuous feedback loop with the warfighter. Program representatives summarized the approach as "getting it to the schoolhouse and one brigade and then receiving feedback so we can incorporate that into our second capability drop and provide better capability."

"That's kind of how the model of this works," Dorrer said. "We can do more rapid changes. We can pace the threat better. As the threat evolves, we can pace the threat and be more adaptive to changes in the environment that we'll be operating in."

However, while original plans called for fielding the first capability drop at just two sites, Army leadership decided to expand the fielding to an additional 19 brigades across the Army. That expanded fielding has begun.

Development of a second capability drop should have been completed in August and will enter testing later this year. Differences between the two drops include targeting of different MOSs. While the first drop was designed for application by the electronic warfare officer, the second drop targets the spectrum manager, with expanded capabilities that allow for frequency assignment, frequency integration and deconfliction within the area of operation. It will also allow, for the first time, communications between echelons; using the existing Army network to exchange data from one Electronic Warfare Planning and Management Tool to another.

Current projections are that broad fielding of the second drop will occur in 2019.

Ongoing evaluations of the early capability drops are also being used to inform future system capability drops, with capability drop three slated to start development in fiscal 2018 and fielding around fiscal 2020. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Intelligence, Electronic Warfare and Sensors
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.