California’s Public Colleges and Universities Face Massive Construction Costs

By EdSource | Daily News (Los Angeles, CA), December 19, 2017 | Go to article overview

California’s Public Colleges and Universities Face Massive Construction Costs


EdSource, Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)


By MIKHAIL ZINSHTEYN, EdSource

Facing building construction and renovation expenses approaching $50 billion over the next five years, California public colleges and universities could save money by sharing both the cost of new facilities and how they are used.

That’s one of the conclusions of a new report by the College Futures Foundation, a nonprofit organization that promotes greater access to higher education.

“The capital financing needs for the public institutions in California are immense and overwhelming, and neither the state nor the institutions have a coherent plan for addressing them,” the report said.

“Our public higher education system is an incredible asset for California,” said Monica Lozano, the organization’s new CEO who until recently was chairperson of the UC Board of Regents. “If we are to ensure that the system’s facilities can meet the needs of our state now and in the future, California will need a systematic way to pay for maintenance and accommodate growing demand.”

The report says California faces an urgent need to maintain and expand its college campuses to make room for more students and upgrade aging buildings.

“We’ve got to find a new way to address the growing student population in higher education in California,” said Patrick J. Lenz, the author of the report. He is a veteran higher education finance director who has led budget and fiscal planning for all three systems of higher education in the state.

Over the next several years, each of them project having to make massive capital investments:

Between 2017-18 and 2021-22, the California Community Colleges estimates that it will need to spend $20.1 billion in building costs in part to make room for an additional 145,000 students expected to enroll during that period.

The California State University anticipates $12.5 billion in capital costs for “facilities improvements and capital improvements” over the same period.

The University of California reports needing roughly $14.6 billion between 2015-16 and 2021-22 to update its buildings, in part to make space for 10,000 additional undergraduates.

Lenz said he hopes the report will spur the higher education leaders to take seriously the concept of joint spending and usage to avoid duplicate structures. That could, he said, result in major cost savings.

He cited UCLA as an example of a campus that has “no ability really to expand.” But nearby community colleges have enough available land to construct new buildings for laboratories and classrooms that could then be occupied by both campuses, he said. That would be ideal for commuter students who don’t live on UCLA’s campus anyway. It’s a strategy that could address some of the building needs of both campuses by financing just one structure.

There’s already a working model in the state. The report notes that UC Davis and the Los Rios Community College District joined forces in 2012 to open a new community college facility on the UC campus, called the Davis Center. The arrangement has led to more community college students being integrated into the social life of a UC campus, according the report.

Don Palm, the dean of the Davis Center, said that UC Davis also rents out classrooms in the center when it is short of classroom space at its main campus. In past years, course schedules at the center have also allowed the same classes to be available for both UC and community college students, such as those in foreign-language instruction in Farsi, Tagalog and Vietnamese.

Lenz said new ideas are needed because there is simply a lack of funding to cover the projected costs. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

California’s Public Colleges and Universities Face Massive Construction Costs
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.