Comedy in the Classroom? How Improv Can Promote Literacy

By Lenters, Kimberly; of, Associate Professor et al. | The Canadian Press, January 22, 2018 | Go to article overview

Comedy in the Classroom? How Improv Can Promote Literacy


Lenters, Kimberly, of, Associate Professor, Calgary, University of, The Canadian Press


Comedy in the classroom? How improv can promote literacy

--

This article was originally published on The Conversation, an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts. Disclosure information is available on the original site.

___

Author: Kimberly Lenters, Associate Professor of Education, University of Calgary

Since its first entry on the comedy scene in the 1950s, improvisational comedy, otherwise know as improv, has changed the world of comedy.

In his book Improv Nation, Sam Wasson audaciously proclaims that improv has "replaced jazz as America's most popular art form." Adding to this declaration, New York Times writer Jason Zinoman describes the ascent of improv as "one of the most important stories in popular culture."

But what does the rise of improv comedy have to do with classroom literacy instruction?

As a former elementary school teacher turned professor of literacy education, it has been my observation, in numerous settings over many years, that children often want to be funny in their storytelling. But many are not quite sure how to go about it.

And when children do give humorous writing a try, sometimes the result falls outside of what is considered acceptable by the adults in the room and their efforts are met with ambivalence or outright disapproval.

Humour is a tricky thing -- what some find funny, others find distasteful. Nonetheless, the potential humour has always held -- for both entertainment and social commentary -- compels me to explore its possibilities for literacy instruction in the elementary school classroom.

As part of a recent research project, my team and I spoke with 10 professional comedians in Calgary, asking them how they might approach comedy in the classroom. Almost unanimously, they recommended improv as the best means for helping children find their funny selves, along with a number of benefits.

Following their suggestion, we took improv into the classroom, and by doing so, have come to see the brilliance of their suggestions.

Collaborative storytelling

In this article, I explore the benefits of improv to literacy instruction. But first I should be clear regarding my understanding of literacy. I view literacy as much more than the skills to decipher and write words on a page.

Literacy involves numerous communication modes -- not just reading and writing, but also listening and speaking, viewing and representing.

In my work, I also consider somewhat ephemeral aspects of literacy and ask how things such as "affect," gesture, space, time and improvisation play a role in students' literacy development.

This is where improv comes in. In improv, all or most of the dialogue and action is unscripted; instead, the performance is generated spontaneously as the players interact with each other on stage. The collaborative story depends on the principle of "Yes, and...."

As improv specialist Karen Hough explains: "No matter what an actor says onstage, ('I'm a goldfish!') she knows that not only will her troupe immediately accept and support the idea ('Yes, you're a goldfish!') they will also add to it. ('And I'm the aquarium keeper.')"

Yes, and... sets the stage for one of improv's golden rules: Make your partner look good.

Flourishing creativity

In improv, there are no fixed or pre-planned ways to end a story -- endings depend entirely on what the players bring to the improv assemblage. The collaborative story-building is reliant upon the participation of each player and, at times, it also depends on contributions from the audience.

Improv's yes, and... collaborative ethos provides supports that can be particularly helpful to children who struggle to find ideas for stories, or who are challenged by the prospect of creating interesting endings. It also nurtures a climate in which even the most reticent are encouraged to participate. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Comedy in the Classroom? How Improv Can Promote Literacy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.