Editing Men out of History in the Name of Feminism Is Revisionism at Its Worst

Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The, January 23, 2018 | Go to article overview

Editing Men out of History in the Name of Feminism Is Revisionism at Its Worst


Revising history to suit one's purposes is a common tactic for manipulative or ignorant people. Lately though, it's become increasingly common among people who want to encourage or discourage gender roles or to raise awareness about either feminism or the patriarchy.

For example, recently, someone affiliated with the group known as the MRA's -- Men's Rights Activists -- decided to edit all the parts out of "Star Wars: The Last Jedi" that aren't centered around men.

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The resulting film is less than three minutes long and it's gone viral: Glamour magazine called it "hilarious."

First, there is a bit of a leap from science fiction to a tale -- albeit also fictional -- based on an important world event. Star Wars is about good and evil, but is completely invented, though a perhaps iconic piece of American filmmaking. "Saving Private Ryan," while also fictional -- there was no confirmed story about a bunch of soldiers risking their lives to save one man -- was also an homage to the approximately 300,000 men who died fighting Axis enemies during World War II.

Second, while both of these editing schemes may be tongue-in-cheek, there is still a hint of revisionist history, particularly with the latter. Women are a part of history as are men. Both have played various roles throughout the spans of time. It's true, in America, women did not always have equal rights, equal access, or enjoy equal privileges, but that's largely not the case now. Sure, women don't appear to be equally present in all situations of life, in all industries at all levels, because they often make different choices regarding work and family.

Women were integral to the World War II effort in many key ways. The Twitter user who made these edits reminded me that some women even died in this effort. …

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