Cannabis Education: Prevalence and Socio-Demographic Correlates among Ontario Middle and High School Students

Canadian Journal of Public Health, January 1, 2017 | Go to article overview

Cannabis Education: Prevalence and Socio-Demographic Correlates among Ontario Middle and High School Students


Dear Editor:

A leading public health concern in legalizing recreational cannabis across Canada pertains to cannabis consumption among adolescents.1 This population group is particularly vulnerable to the risks associated with cannabis use, and this has been attributed to the drug's interference with structural (e.g., brain volume) and functional (e.g., cognitive, emotional) brain development.2 Consistent evidence further reveals that early and frequent use during the teenage years is linked with low school performance, road traffic injury due to cannabis-impaired driving, and prospective psychiatric illness (e.g., anxiety, depression, schizophrenia).3,4

Despite the evidence, Canadian adolescents continue to have a benign view of cannabis5 and exhibit the highest prevalence of past-year use among their global peers (i.e., 28%).6 The related concerns with legalization revolve around the drug's increase in public accessibility, "normalization" of use, and potential spike in consumption patterns. In recognition of cannabis' risks, in conjunction with upcoming legalization next summer (i.e., 2018), many Canadian organizations and groups - including the Task Force on Cannabis Legalization and Regulation - have stressed the importance of providing cannabis education to adolescents to mitigate harms of use in this at-risk population.

Thus, it is timely and important to begin monitoring and highlighting the proportion of adolescents who receive cannabis education in the coming years. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first Canadian study to examine the prevalence of high school students receiving cannabis-specific education. By doing so, a "pre-legalization" benchmark will be set for "postlegalization" comparative purposes. Further explored are the socio-demographic correlates of those receiving cannabis education, which can inform strategies tailored towards curbing cannabis use.

METHODS

This study used data from the 2015 Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey (n = 10 426;59% student completion rate). The self-report survey - led by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health - is Canada's longest ongoing population-representative health survey, which helps monitor health risk behaviours in adolescents (i.e., grades 7-12). Further survey details can be found elsewhere.7

This study presents outcome data (n = 4863) on adolescents who reported to receive cannabis education during the 20142015 academic year. The independent variables used included gender, grade, ethnicity, socio-economic status, parent education level, and school location. Descriptive, univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted using STATA 14. Analyses were based on a complex sample design with 21 strata (region by school level) and 220 primary sampling units (schools). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Cannabis Education: Prevalence and Socio-Demographic Correlates among Ontario Middle and High School Students
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.