Simon Kinberg Plans 'X'-It from Sunset Strip Area

By David, Mark | Variety, January 24, 2018 | Go to article overview

Simon Kinberg Plans 'X'-It from Sunset Strip Area


David, Mark, Variety


"X-Men" franchise writer-producer Simon Kinberg, a 2016 Oscar nominee as a producer of the blockbuster sci-fidrama "The Martian," has listed a large, sleekly appointed residence at the base of the celebrated Bird Streets neighborhood just above L.A.'s perennially swinging Sunset Strip at a smidgen less than $9 million. The London-born, L.A.-based producer, whose current slate of projects include the "Designated Survivor" and "Legion" TV series as well as the upcoming "Logan's Run" reboot, purchased the property just over two years ago for $8.4 million. Obscured behind a fastidiously trimmed hedge and described in marketing materials as a "designer-done modern East Coast Traditional" with a state-of-the-art home automation system, the almost 6,300-square foot residence has four en suite bedrooms plus an attached guesthouse/home office and a total of 7.5 bathrooms.

Spacious, open-concept living and entertaining spaces include a double-height entrance gallery with a wrought-iron stair railing, a dining room wrapped in wood paneling painted a sophisticated shade of gray, a living room anchored by a massive floor-to-ceiling book-matched marble fireplace and an eat-in kitchen. A basement level includes a media lounge and a climate-controlled walk-in wine cellar, while the grassy, courtyard-style backyard offers a variety of sunny and shaded lounging areas, an outdoor kitchen and a small swimming pool next to an oversize spa.

The in-demand script doctor once owned a 1930s Monterey colonial just a few doors down the street that he bought in 2004 for $2.85 million from Caresse Henry, late manager of pop superstars Madonna and Ricky Martin, and sold in early 2013 for $3.45 million to Tinseltown scion David Katzenberg, producer for the 1980s period sitcom "The Goldbergs." He continues to own a not quite 7,500-square-foot cedar-shingled residence in Pacific Palisades, Calif., he picked up in late 2012 for $8.6 million.

Dustin Lance Black Lists L.A. Starter House

Dustin Lance Black, creator, writer, director and producer of the epic 2017 LGBTQ docudrama miniseries "When We Rise," is asking almost $900,000 for his unassuming, well-maintained, apartment-size starter house in the historic Hollywood Heights neighborhood above L.A.'s iconic Hollywood Bowl. Privately positioned above the street atop a two-car garage, the 1,000-square-foot 1950s bungalow, with just two bedrooms and one bathroom, was purchased by the 2008 Oscar-winning "Milk" writer-producer in late 2004 for $525,000.

A charming Dutch-style front door set into a petite elevated porch opens to a generously windowed living room with narrow-gauge hardwood floors, partially paneled walls and floor-to-ceiling built-in bookshelves. The red-painted separate dining room has bead-board-accented walls, while the compact kitchen, which does not have a dishwasher, features mintygreen retro-style ceramic-tile countertops and a restored range. The lone bathroom has vintage yellow shower tiles and an idiosyncratic mosaic-tiled sink, and both bedrooms have French doors to a backyard composed of a series of slender, stonepaved terraces.

Married in May 2017 to English diver Tom Daley, a bronze medalist at the 2016 Olympics, Black long ago decamped Hollywood Heights for a more substantial four-bedroom and 4.5-bathroom 1924 English Tudor cottage tucked behind secured gates on a busy West Hollywood street that he picked up in 2010 for close to $1.5 million. Black and Daley additionally share a triplex loftin a converted, late- 19th-century hops-processing warehouse in London's Southwark borough that has a hot tub on the roof. Black keeps his Oscar statuette there, in the guest loo.

Showbiz Attorney's Idaho Mansion up for Auction

The über-contemporary, art-filled Hailey, Idaho, mansion of powerhouse entertainment attorney Jake Bloom is headed to auction at the end of January with a reserve price of $11 million. The scraggly bearded lawyer, whose Hollywood A-list clients include Jerry Bruckheimer and Jackie Chan, initially and unsuccessfully attempted to sell the resort-like Rocky Mountain retreat last year with a too-optimistic price of $18 million. …

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