Libby Char: Doctor Lobbies to Help Emergency Medical Services Meet an Increasing Demand

By Viotti, Vicki | Honolulu Star - Advertiser, February 2, 2018 | Go to article overview

Libby Char: Doctor Lobbies to Help Emergency Medical Services Meet an Increasing Demand


Viotti, Vicki, Honolulu Star - Advertiser


DENNIS ODA / DODA@STARADVERTISER.COM Dr. Libby Char

Dr. Libby Char has lived and breathed the health-care profession for most of her 50-plus years.

Her husband is on the faculty at the John A. Burns School of Medicine. She works now as a consultant on community projects aimed at improving the emergency medical response, including her post chairing the state Emergency Medical Services Advisory Board, currently lobbying hard to expand the state network of ambulance units.

Char volunteered in hospitals before she worked in them, doing transport and other nonmedical functions before becoming a physician herself.

It didn’t take her long in medical school — at the University of Hawaii — for her to decide that emergency medicine would be her calling. There was something about the immediacy of the work that appealed to her, she said, and she felt drawn to the people in the emergency and “pre-hospital” practice, including the paramedics and others.

“Emergency medicine is a team sport,” she added. “You form some lifelong bonds with those on the team, and you get a lot of satisfaction from being a part of that team, knowing that you are all there pulling together to arrive at the best outcome.”

A Hawaii-born “proud public school graduate” of Kalani High, Char did her residency at UCLA, which she saw as an optimal emergency medicine training environment. She worked at The Queen’s Medical Center ER from 1997, followed by 5-1/2 years heading the city’s Emergency Services Department, supervising ambulance and ocean-safety crews.

Char said she chose living and working in her home state because she loves the relaxed lifestyle here, the hiking and other outdoor pursuits. She underscores the importance of balance between work and leisure whenever she’s advising medical students or young doctors.

That said, advocating for better resources and facilities that they need remains her focus. As she walked past the ambulances en route to the interview, she struck up an easy conversation with the crew gathered outside the ER. Working with these people, and the patients they serve, is deeply fulfilling.

“We just had a meeting with somebody who had gone into cardiac arrest, and through the efforts of the pre-hospital providers, they saved this person,” she said. “We recently had a get-together with this person, and the fire crew and EMS crew. And that kind of thing is just heart-warming.”

QUESTION: How hopeful are you that the additional funding request for ambulance service will be approved this year?

ANSWER: I try and maintain some degree of optimism every year about funding and the Legislature. Without it, the motivation to send in testimony, rouse the stakeholders and even just to show up at the Legislature becomes very difficult. …

The legislative committees we interact with have been very supportive of our quest for additional EMS resources, and we are very grateful for that. …

Where we have an issue is with the fiscal side of the Legislature. … Last year they stated that these are new projects, and there is no funding for new projects. The fiscal process seems very murky and nebulous to me.

An additional EMS unit is not a “new project.” It is simply trying to designate appropriate resources to keep up with growing population demands and shifting demographics. The need won’t dissipate, just because they ignored it for another year.

In fact, it will compound and we will have a greater strain on the existing ambulances, medics, equipment and the entire system of emergency care, including all of our first responders. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Libby Char: Doctor Lobbies to Help Emergency Medical Services Meet an Increasing Demand
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.