Juvenile Justice - Plan Would Reduce Number of Youths in Detention

News Sentinel, February 6, 2018 | Go to article overview

Juvenile Justice - Plan Would Reduce Number of Youths in Detention


"Too many kids get lost in the juvenile justice system, and the deeper into the system the more likely the child is to enter the adult corrections system later."

Todd Skelton

Deputy counsel to Gov. Haslam

NASHVILLE - Gov. Bill Haslam's plan to reform juvenile justice would shrink the number of young offenders in detention centers and would lead to shorter sentences for some lower-level offenses.

Haslam's office filed legislation Wednesday that outlined the contours of the strategy he hinted at during his State of the State address on Monday. It is paired with $4.5 million in Haslam's budget for resources in rural pockets of the state.

Administration officials say the changes proposed in the Juvenile Justice Reform Act of 2018 would keep more kids out of the system and would reduce the likelihood that they would commit crimes as adults.

"Too many kids get lost in the juvenile justice system, and the deeper into the system the more likely the child is to enter the adult corrections system later," Todd Skelton, deputy counsel to the governor, said in a statement. "With responsible reforms that focus resources on more serious offenders and ensure that interventions are targeted to the risks and needs of each child, we aim to improve public safety and outcomes for youth and families, reduce recidivism, and be better stewards of taxpayer dollars."

The bill represents the culmination of two years of work on the issue spearheaded by leaders from the General Assembly and criminal justice statewide. Buy-in from those groups will be crucial in the effort to get the legislation smoothly to the governor's desk.

Stacy Miller, the juvenile court team leader for the Davidson County District Attorney's Office, has worked with the team that developed recommendations for the bill. She said getting a mention in the governor's high-profile speech was a win for an issue that doesn't often see the spotlight.

"It's really easy to sit back and say, 'Let's just lock these kids up,' " she said. "I was just really impressed with how open-minded the administration has been with moving forward."

Panel's work shaped proposed changes to the system

The bill was built around recommendations from a task force called last year to identify problems with the juvenile justice system. Its findings challenged the established system, which can send young people to lock-up after they skip school or exhibit "unruly" behavior that wouldn't be considered illegal for adults.

"We know that what we've been doing with youth and the juvenile justice system certainly hasn't been working," said Metro police Cmdr. Gordon Howey, a task force member who spent years overseeing youth services in his department. "We've got to do something that's going to break that cycle of arrest, incarceration, get out, arrest. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Juvenile Justice - Plan Would Reduce Number of Youths in Detention
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.