Gender Inequality Is Not Set in Stone

The Scotsman, February 3, 2018 | Go to article overview

Gender Inequality Is Not Set in Stone


R ampant sexual harassment at a corporate charity dinner. The BBC accused of breaking equal pay laws.

EasyJet's new male CEO offered £34,000 more to do the same job as his female predecessor. You don't have to look far to find gender inequality alive and kicking in 2018. And those are just stories from the last fortnight.

Not all sexism is so blatant or obvious. Part of the problem is that we are lulled into a false sense of comfort by warm words on corporate websites about diversity initiatives, and a small number of women in powerful positions such as Nicola Sturgeon and Theresa May.

This masks the fact that informal power structures in politics, the media and business are all still dominated by rich, white men.

Gendered assumptions abound in society. This week Anna Isaac tweeted how a man on the train had expressed surprised to see a "young lady" reading the Telegraph business pages and the Financial Times. After he mansplained what CBI and ECB stands for, he asked her: "So, what do you do?" She is the economics correspondent for the Telegraph. Replies to her story confirmed that many others similarly experience being dismissed or not taken seriously because they are women. Many studies show the ingrained gender bias spanning different spheres.

Job applications for a science lab manager position were assessed differently depending on whether the name on an identical CV was John or Jennifer - surprise, surprise, John was more likely to be offered the job and was also offered 14 per cent more salary on average. The same novel submitted to multiple publishers secured eight times more interest when it was submitted by George instead of Catherine. Online, male journalists are disproportionately followed and retweeted compared to female journalists, and accounts with female usernames receive up to 25 times more malicious messages.

Mostly this disadvantages women, but when it comes to areas like caring for children, it is men who are wrongly assumed to be incompetent.

We exist within a culture that is sexist: from outright misogyny to subtle cues that perpetuate gender stereotypes. It should not be surprising that we all absorb this, to little girls and little boys. Later it continues through the world of work, sport and the media around us.

The good news is, gender inequality is not inevitable. We can choose to change it, every single one of us. Having been minister for women for three years, I know the limitations of government in tackling gender inequality. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Gender Inequality Is Not Set in Stone
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.