Part of Life's Rich Tapestry: Stolen Rosslyn Chapel Panel Is Painstakingly Recreated

By Bradley, Jane | The Scotsman, May 2, 2017 | Go to article overview

Part of Life's Rich Tapestry: Stolen Rosslyn Chapel Panel Is Painstakingly Recreated


Bradley, Jane, The Scotsman


IT was like a mystery straight outof the pages of the Da Vinci Codewhen a panel of the Great Tapestry of Scotland was stolen from thewalls of an artgalleryand was never seen again.

But now the missing panel - depicting the history of the ancient Rosslyn Chapel - has been painstakingly recreated by its original stitchers and restored to its rightful home with the rest ofthe tapestry.

The section, which tells the story of the Apprentice Pillar at Rosslyn Chapel, was taken by thieves while the artwork was on display in Kirkcaldy Galleries in September 2015.

Police worked to trace the missing piece, part ofthe longest tapestry in the world, but were unable to do so.

Now, the panel, one of 160 in the work, each of which took about 500 hours to create with more than 300 miles of woollen yarn, is to be part of the continuing exhibition tour before being displayed withtherestofthe tapestry ata new arts centre in Galashiels.

The replacement panel has been created over the pastyear by the seven original stitchers, all of whom live in or near Roslin. Margaret Humphries, Jean Lindsay, Anne Beedie, Jinty Murray, Barbara Stokes, Fiona McIntosh and Phillipa Peat worked for hundreds of hours on the replacement.

Ms McIntosh said: "Wewere all devastated that our panel had been stolen, but we are happy now that it has been remade and delighted that it will once again take its place with the rest ofthe tapestry."

The brainchild of author Alexander McCall Smith, the tapestry tells the story of Scotland's history and has been touring the country since it was completed in 2013.

A total of 1,000 stitchers - more than 40 of them called Margaret-worked on the original design. …

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