Now & Then


5 FEBRUARY 1782: Spanish forces captured Minorca Island, off Spain, from British.

1811: The Prince of Wales became Prince Regent on the established chronic porphyria of George III.

1850: Frank S Baldwin patented the first adding machine. It was 20 inches high and weighed 8lb. 1920: Royal Air Force College at Cranwell opened and had its first intake of apprentices. 1922: First issue of Reader's Digest published, in New York. 1924: The BBC "pips" or time signals were heard for the first time.

1931: Captain Malcolm Campbell, driving Bluebird, set world land speed record of 245mph at Daytona Beach. He was first man to exceed 200mph.

1936: Charlie Chaplin's film Modern Times premiered in America.

1961: Sunday Telegraph began publication.

1962: The conjunction of Sun, Moon, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn was watched with interest by astronomers. In India the end of the world was forecast and all events were cancelled, including Hindu weddings, as people waited for doomsday.

1967: The Musicians' Union banned the Rolling Stones's Let's Spend The Night Together from the Eamonn Andrews television show.

1971: Astronauts from US Apollo 14 landed on the Moon.

1982: Laker Airlines, created by former British pilot Sir Freddie Laker to cut prices and make air travel more accessible, collapsed with debts of £270 million.

1983: Klaus Barbie, Nazi war criminal, was flown to France to face charges.

1989: Sky Television, headed by Rupert Murdoch, launched the first four of its six planned channels.

1994: A controversial lastminute penalty gave England a 15-14 win over Scotland in the Calcutta Cup match at Murrayfield.

1997: The so-called Big Three banks in Switzerland announced the creation of a $71 million fund to aid Holocaust survivors and their families.

2000: Russian forces massacred at least 60 civilians in the Novye Aldi suburb of Grozny, Chechnya. …

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