Prep-LifeWatch

The Canadian Press, February 7, 2018 | Go to article overview

Prep-LifeWatch


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(Wickenheiser-Concussion-Research)

Retired Canadian hockey star Hayley Wickenheiser has decided to leave her brain to science.

The Concussion Legacy Foundation says the four-time Olympic gold medallist and seven-time world champion is one of three female Olympians to commit her brain to the Boston-based organization.

American bobsledder Elana Meyers Taylor and Hockey Hall of Famer Angela Ruggiero of the U-S are also listed in an announcement.

Wickenheiser has been involved with concussion-related causes in the past, including helping develop video game technology to treat concussions last summer.

Wickenheiser, now 39, says she suffered dizziness and nausea after taking a hit in a Swedish men's pro league in 2008. (The Canadian Press)

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(FASD-Kids)

A large multi-site study released by the Journal of the American Medical Association suggests that Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders are up to 10 times more common than first thought.

It says drinking alcohol during pregnancy could have serious consequences for a baby, including central nervous system damage and physical defects.

Experts previously thought one per cent of children are affected by the serious, permanent disorders.

Researchers looked more than 66-hundred first grade children from four communities in the United States and used their findings to estimate that between one to five per cent of children are affected by the disorder.

Only two out of 222 children with FASD in the study had been diagnosed before, suggesting under-diagnosis is a huge problem. (ABC)

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(Stimulation-Memory)

A new article published in Nature Communications says stimulating an area of the brain could lead to better memory.

Twenty-five neurosurgery patients, all with epilepsy, were asked to do word memory tasks in order to measure their neural activity.

Based on their past brain activity when they were remembering, a model was made to calculate how likely a patient would recall words.

If the model predicted that recall would be below 50 per cent, electrical stimulation was applied, using electrodes implanted on the brain. …

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