What's Love? Mere Chemical Reactions, Explains Allahabad University Scientist

Hindustan Times (New Delhi, India), February 14, 2018 | Go to article overview

What's Love? Mere Chemical Reactions, Explains Allahabad University Scientist


Allahabad, Feb. 14 -- Some call it elixir of life. Some say it's blind, and beyond logic.

At a time when love seems to be in air, Valentine Day, here is a scientist who says it's just a chemical reaction.

"It is a plain reaction of chemicals secreted by the brain," says professor SI Rizvi, eminent biochemist of Allahabad University.

"The pleasure associated with the feeling of 'being in love' comes from the effect of a class of chemicals known as endorphins which act on the brain much the same way as opioids," says Rizvi who is known worldwide for his work on decoding aging and emotions.

Rizvi's work on aging and emotions was last published in American research journal 'Life Sciences.'

Explaining the scientific view, Rizvi says the emotion of romantic love also comes with an increase in dopamine and nor epinephrine levels in the brain.

These chemicals create connections in the brain which make the brain more emotionally attached to the 'loved one' and activate the reward centre of the brain leading to a pleasurable experience, says the scientist.

So what prompted him to decode love, scientifically?

"Extreme reactions and sacrifices of people sharing deep bond of love and their public display prompted me to study the chemistry of emotions," he says of what in common parlance is perceived as 'chemistry' between two people, who are in love.

Further explaining the chemistry behind the phenomenon, Rizvi says, "Another hormone which adds to the chemical relationship of romantic love is oxytocin secreted from the pituitary gland present in the brain. …

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