The Data Doesn’t Seem to Be Vouching for Vouchers

By Lindemulder, Michael Dean | Chicago Policy Review (Online), February 16, 2018 | Go to article overview

The Data Doesn’t Seem to Be Vouching for Vouchers


Lindemulder, Michael Dean, Chicago Policy Review (Online)


Arguments supporting private management of schools date back to the founding of the United States and have reflected a variety of ideological positions. The call for privatization policies like school vouchers intensified in the mid-20th century due largely to the assertions of economist Milton Friedman. Friedman proposed that the government should provide funds for schools but should not directly provide instruction, reasoning that the free-market would inherently improve educational outcomes through competition. In addition, at the height of the civil rights movement, the call for vouchers resonated with policymakers seeking a mechanism with which to resist integration of schools. Recently, the push for vouchers has been more openly adopted by those who seek to use government dollars to fund religious education, with evidence suggesting Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos falls into this camp.

In a recent study, Jonathan Mills and Patrick Wolf examine the Louisiana Scholarship Program (LSP), a voucher program that began as a pilot program in New Orleans in 2008 and was expanded four years later by Governor Bobby Jindal to the entire state. The researchers note that Louisiana is not the first place to utilize vouchers for its students. Across the nation, the results of these programs have been mixed. For example, according to Mills and Wolf’s literature survey, Florida’s system appears to be benefiting students near the eligibility cut off in terms of reading but not math. At the same time, a voucher program in Charlotte, North Carolina, has not produced improvements in student outcomes despite increasing funding. Studies of the voucher program in Ohio have shown a negative impact on students who participate.

In the case of the LSP, the statewide expansion of the program provided the opportunity for 5,000 low- and middle-income students to transfer to private schools with state funds. In many cities and states that design voucher programs, eligibility is targeted-most often at low-income families. Louisiana’s program goes one step further because it is double targeted. To qualify, students must not only come from low-income families but also attend low-performing schools. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Data Doesn’t Seem to Be Vouching for Vouchers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.