Editorial

By O'Connell, Anne | Canadian Review of Social Policy, January 1, 2017 | Go to article overview

Editorial


O'Connell, Anne, Canadian Review of Social Policy


The articles for this issue trace the ways in which social policies negatively affect vulnerable populations, and in some cases, when they are designed to assist them. The ability of seniors to pay family members for caregiving duties in Newfoundland attempts to address a gap in service provision, but what does it mean to purchase and privatize care in this way? The ability for trans persons to access more services and to be included in the state is also questioned, when offered only to those who meet the neoliberal demand to be a productive entrepreneurial self. More punitive policies are exposed in this issue, such as, the federal government's desire to de-stabilize the legal status of permanent residents by exposing "fraudulent" marriages and deporting "criminals." New approaches to social policy are also put forward, such as, the benefits of considering health as a central feature in all social policy, especially when it comes to social assistance programs. Finally, our commentary for this issue, tracks the effectiveness of the Canadian Provincial Social Assistance Payments to Non-Institutionalized Disabled Adults, over a 30 year period in efforts to examine if rates have improved over time. The authors argue that the results provide even more evidence for the need of a guaranteed annual income program.

In the first article, The Ethics of Care and the Newfoundland Paid Family Caregiver Program: An assessment, Maggie Fitzgerald Murphy examines how a new pilot program initiated in 2014 by the conservative government, allows eligible home support clients to pay family members directly for care and support in the home. The program is designed to address the critical gaps in long term care needs for the elderly and adults with disabilities; the author's focus here is on the elderly. While the new model is intended to offer clients more choice in their own care by providing an income source to family members providing care, the author highlights ongoing practical and theoretical tensions with this policy approach. Practical concerns and tensions include the fact that only one family care provider can be compensated for their labour, and the client becomes their employer, responsible for tracking the care received. The needs of the caregiver are not considered in this policy. The author argues that this approach re-shapes relationships in the home, care giving and care receiving, and relegates care to the private sphere. While plans such as these may be concerned with equality, the author states that this approach views elderly clients as a homogenous group and ignores the systemic and intersectional inequities that shape the needs and everyday lives of the elderly and their families. The author proposes a critical ethics of care as a framework to assess this program and others; one that attends to context, material realities, and how our identities and needs are produced in relationship to others, to institutions, and our systems.

In Producing Tran economicus: Deploying Market Logic in the Fight for Trans Rights, Evan Vipond critiques the ways in which trans persons are gaining access to and inclusion into the state and civil society by fulfilling neoliberal demands to present as productive, self-sufficient and self-made. Drawing on Foucault's theorizations on neoliberal governmentality, market logic and human capital the author critiques liberal discourses of equality, inclusion and social progress as terms and approaches that lead to benefits for the few. In the same vein as homo economicus, the author introduces the subject of Trans economicus who is valued in terms of their productivity and as a worthy beneficiary of medical care and transition related procedures that themselves are configured in market terms. As some trans persons gain access to services, this inclusion justifies the exclusion of others who fail to attain enough human capital to qualify and pay for important services, namely low income, racialized and disabled trans persons. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Editorial
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.