Game Reviews: Professor Evil and the Citadel of Time and Entropy: Worlds Collide Are Both Extremely Well-Designed

By Morgenegg, Ryan | Deseret News (Salt Lake City), February 20, 2018 | Go to article overview

Game Reviews: Professor Evil and the Citadel of Time and Entropy: Worlds Collide Are Both Extremely Well-Designed


Morgenegg, Ryan, Deseret News (Salt Lake City)


Passport Game Studios is a premiere publisher of board games with several hit titles in its library of creations. Recently it produced both a board and card game worth mentioning, Professor Evil and the Citadel of Time and Entropy: Worlds Collide.

The game Professor Evil and the Citadel of Time is a cooperative game that players can win together. It rewards team play and makes everybody at the table feel good when the game is won. It's excellent for families.

The players represent adventurers trying to stop the crazy Professor Evil from stealing some of the world's most precious historical artifacts such as the Ark of the Covenant or Da Vinci's Notebook. The setting location is Professor Evil's spooky castle. Players have to break in, get around the security measures and get the items out.

Using three actions per turn, two to four players will need to move around Professor Evil's mansion, open locked doors, deactivate security measures and rescue the historical items before they disappear in time.

However, every time a player takes a turn, so does Professor Evil. He travels from room to room closing doors and turning security measures back on. You never know where he is headed and at the last moment he can foil even the best plans.

To help overcome these obstacles, each character has a set of six unique cards that let them bend the rules. Two are dealt each turn and one is played. And at certain times during the game, each player can use a super unique power once or keep an active ongoing power for the rest of the game.

To win, players race against time to collect four treasures before Professor Evil can stash four treasures for himself. If players use up too much time, they will be defeated. The game is well-designed for balance as each game seems to come right down to the wire.

The board in the game is beautifully illustrated and depicts Professor Evil's hideout room by room. The player cards, trap and item tokens stand out with engaging art elements and fun character depictions. Everything is first class.

Setup is easy and so is learning this light adventure game. Sessions can take about 30 to 45 minutes and the game is designed to get people playing and engaged in no time flat. …

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