Beyond the March: African-American History Education, Appreciation, and Conscientious Citizenship

Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The, February 25, 2018 | Go to article overview

Beyond the March: African-American History Education, Appreciation, and Conscientious Citizenship


From the civil rights movement to the women's liberation, gay rights, #BlackLivesMatter, and #MeToo movements, there's not a single moment in time that is disconnected from the long struggle to expand human rights. Continuing this struggle requires a commitment to pass on the challenges, triumphs, and lessons of the past to future generations. We must teach the black student from south Chicago as well as the white student from the small town in Iowa to walk in the shoes of the heroes and heroines who fought to make this nation more fair and just.

Every February, our nation pays homage to African-American history. This heightened exposure frequently starts and stops at the steps of the Lincoln Memorial where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech. Unfortunately, we rarely go beyond Dr. King's historic oration to discuss the demands of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom or highlight the veteran organizers, such as Bayard Rustin and A. Philip Randolph, who made the march possible. The far too common "poster on the wall" approach to African-American history fails to capture the rich and multifaceted components of the African-American experience.

Developing a broader and more inclusive understanding of American history allows Americans of all races to acquire a greater appreciation for the diversity of our nation and become engaged in building King's World House in which "we have to live together--black and white, Easterner and Westerner, Gentile and Jew, Catholic and Protestant, Moslem [sic] and Hindu--a family unduly separated in ideas, culture and interest, who, because we can never again live apart, must learn somehow to live with each other in peace." As I have explained, a deeper understanding of African-American History is a tool "for understanding how did we get here, where we are going, and where we see ourselves in the world?"

EVERFI administered survey questions to 2,406 students across 28 states who took EVERFI's 306--African-American History(TM) digital course, which explores the lives, stories, and lessons of African-Americans throughout history.

Through the survey questions administered in the 306 course, we found that a majority of students (74 percent) felt learning about African-American history is important and only a small minority (8 percent) of students did not think it was important. The students who valued African-American history show traits that make up what we refer to as a "conscientious citizen."

These conscientious citizens are more likely than their peers to say it is important to contribute to their community, more likely to say they will stand up for what is right, and more likely to say they intend to vote. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Beyond the March: African-American History Education, Appreciation, and Conscientious Citizenship
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.