Editorial Exchange: Radio Broadcasting #MeToo Hypocrisy

The Canadian Press, February 26, 2018 | Go to article overview

Editorial Exchange: Radio Broadcasting #MeToo Hypocrisy


Editorial Exchange: Radio broadcasting #MeToo hypocrisy

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An editorial from the Winnipeg Free Press, published Feb. 26:

It's undeniably heartening to see the recent allegations against rock band Hedley taken seriously.

Prior to the #MeToo movement, one imagines the tweets of teenage fans claiming band members engaged in sexual misconduct, possibly with underage girls, would have been dismissed as drama-queen hysterics and swept under the rug.

However, the alacrity and enthusiasm with which everyone from managers to awards shows is rushing to denounce the Vancouver pop-rock band has the sour tang of hypocrisy.

Corus Radio stations across Canada have declared they will no longer include Hedley songs on their playlists.

But Corus, which has Winnipeg affiliate stations, has no problem playing L.A. metal band Mötley Crüe, despite lead singer Vince Neil's multiple convictions of assaulting women. Crüe drummer Tommy Lee spent six months in jail after battering then-wife Pamela Anderson; he and bassist Nikki Sixx admitted to raping a woman in their band autobiography, The Dirt.

And yet barely a day goes by that the band's Girls, Girls, Girls doesn't hit the airwaves.

Bell Media joined in the ban of Hedley songs, but the network of stations happily helped rapper Chris Brown, convicted of felony assault of then-girlfriend Rihanna, reach No. 1 with his 2017 album.

We can probably agree that sleeping with underage girls is a strange career perk to aspire to, but it's certainly one that's well documented among some of music's biggest names.

Bill Wyman of the Rolling Stones. Steven Tyler of Aerosmith. …

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