United Kingdom Might Not Be What May Has in Mind

Scotland on Sunday (Edinburgh, Scotland), March 26, 2017 | Go to article overview

United Kingdom Might Not Be What May Has in Mind


Everyone talks about breaking up the "United Kingdom". Merely losing Northern Ireland (NI) would do that, leaving us here with "Great Britain", a nation formed in 1707. The "United" in "UK" refers to the union with Ireland in 1801. Unionists should take note.

What the SNP hope todois break up Great Britain. In that event, assuming NI remained British, the British state would become "The United Kingdom of England and Northern Ireland". Wales tags along with England.

Consequently, any referendum should be about whether or not Scots want to remain part of "Great Britain".

The Prime Minister claims that the UK is "four nations". Northern Ireland is technically a province and Wales was a principality but now seems to bejust a region of the UK. Scotland and England were independent kingdoms until 1707 when theywere united into "The Kingdom of Great Britain" (one nation). Today there is only one British nation: that of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, the latter the rump of what was the whole of Ireland.

Is the Prime Minister sure she understands the constitutional situation in the country she governs?

Steuart Campbell, Edinburgh

Brexit can help boost whisky and fisheries

Prime Minister Theresa May isofftoagoodstartwithher Article 50 letter to the EU next week triggering the start of Brexit as per her promised timetable.

We can now look forward to the ensuing freedom to worldwide trade and restoration of our democratic rights seriously eroded by the faceless MEPs ofEurope.

Scotland can now plan massive expansion of our fisheries and develop new markets for our whisky industry which will open new doors of unlimited opportunity and prosperity. …

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