BRAIN SURGERY HELPS PUT SEIZURES IN REAR VIEW When Medication Didn't Work, Operation Helped Ease Epilepsy

By Alexander, Rachel | The Spokesman-Review (Spokane, WA), March 5, 2018 | Go to article overview

BRAIN SURGERY HELPS PUT SEIZURES IN REAR VIEW When Medication Didn't Work, Operation Helped Ease Epilepsy


Alexander, Rachel, The Spokesman-Review (Spokane, WA)


Casey Schorr's first seizure happened as he was helping a friend do chores. All of a sudden, the Cheney High School freshman started feeling dizzy.

"When I came to, there were five EMTs standing around my head," Schorr said.

It was the beginning of a high school experience marked deeply by epilepsy. Schorr's seizures became more frequent, and he didn't respond well to medication. His friends helped him through seizures in class, and he missed school for medical appointments.

"It just progressively got worse and worse," he said. He'd have to be home from school earlier so he had time to take the anti-seizure drugs, which made him feel loopy.

"My time that I was able to spend with friends lowered drastically," he said.

His mother, Melani Schorr, said she felt helpless and on edge constantly.

"Every time my phone rang with an unknown number I always had to answer because I didn't know if it was some EMT," she said.

Before Schorr went out with friends, she'd sit them down and make sure they knew what do to if he had a seizure.

"The seizures themselves were super traumatic, but just knowing there was nothing I could do to prevent them or stop them was really, really hard," she said.

Less than a year after his diagnosis, Schorr learned he might have another option: brain surgery.

About two-thirds of people with epilepsy are able to stop seizures with medications. But another third, like Schorr, don't respond well.

Andrew Ko, head of the UW Medicine Functional and Restorative Neurosurgery Program in Seattle, said patients who have failed two tests of good medication are called "refractory," and are usually brought in for more testing to figure out where the epilepsy is coming from.

"If you've been on two drugs and they haven't controlled your epilepsy, the chances of finding a combination that does control it is about five percent," Ko said.

In some of those cases, neurologists and neurosurgeons can work together to pinpoint the part of the brain causing seizures and remove it, often restoring function with minimal side effects.

"I jumped right on it. I was like, 'Do it, I want to do the testing, I want to get it done,' " Schorr said. The family started preparing for a June 2017 surgery at the end of Schorr's senior year of high school. He's already missed about half the school year because of epilepsy, but was able to graduate on time.

Schorr went to Seattle with Melani for a two-week trip, where he had a battery of tests to see whether he qualified for surgery. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

BRAIN SURGERY HELPS PUT SEIZURES IN REAR VIEW When Medication Didn't Work, Operation Helped Ease Epilepsy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.