If Russia Expels British Diplomats, Britain, France, Germany and the US Should Expel Their Russian Ambassadors

By Rogan, Tom | Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The, March 16, 2018 | Go to article overview

If Russia Expels British Diplomats, Britain, France, Germany and the US Should Expel Their Russian Ambassadors


Rogan, Tom, Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The


If Russia follows through on its foreign minister (and eloquent troll) Sergey Lavrov's threat, and expels British diplomats from Moscow, then Britain, France, Germany, and the U.S. should expel Russia's ambassadors to their capitals. Although that might seem like an excessive escalation, there are two reasons why it would be appropriate.

First, the Skripal hit was an unprecedented outrage on British soil. As well as putting two civilians under British care in critical condition, the attack left a police officer seriously ill and endangered the population of Salisbury. Even setting aside how outrageous this attempted assassination is in itself, Russian President Vladimir Putin could have at least chosen a limited attack methodology to kill Skripal without endangering so many others.

Second, thus far, Prime Minister Theresa May's response to this atrocity has been carefully calibrated. May has sent a message of great displeasure and unified British allies around her government. That said, it's also notable what May hasn't done. She hasn't ordered the Russians to vacate their intelligence compounds in north London. She hasn't, as far as we know, authorized covert action against Russian actors inside Russia. And she hasn't yet ordered the Russian ambassador to depart.

That would be the logical next step if Russia now escalates.

After all, it's clear that the Russian government underestimated the speed and success of Britain's effort to unify its allies in its common support. …

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