Spice of Life: Tea, the Defining Beverage of Daily Life

Hindustan Times (New Delhi, India), April 4, 2018 | Go to article overview

Spice of Life: Tea, the Defining Beverage of Daily Life


India, April 4 -- "When your day seems topsy-turvy and as stormy as can be, there is nothing quite as tranquil as a nice hot cup of tea". India is land of chai, chaha or just cha! It is part of Indian ethos, an art, or culinary skill, unabashed love with brewing activity in kitchens daily.

Entertaining over tea has been a legacy of our colonial past. Enid Blyton wrote, "Afternoon tea was launched by the Duchess of Bedford in 1830." Jane Austen's novels are famous for the elaborate tea sessions as she wrote with pride, "I would rather have nothing but tea." An English tea included savoury canapes but the most common items are bread and butter, scones, muffins, crumpets, cakes, biscuits, jams and jellies. Now the charm of tea has gripped almost the entire world. There are tea-serving boutiques that offer high tea options.

We, a group of friends, are self-proclaimed connoisseurs of tea. At 10.45am, we meet in our vacant period at college and enjoy tea with home-made snacks, indulging in 'chai pe charcha'. A chai-tapri is one of the many things over which our friendship grows, our intellectual discussions run, and our trivial trifles get resolved. Sitting on the rooftop balcony of the college cafe, sipping tea, partaking of the colourful panorama of the college's spacious ground teeming with vibrant and versatile youngsters, we sing joyfully, "The teapot is on, the cups are waiting, favourite chairs anticipating, no matter what we have to do. My friends, there's always time for you."

Tea can be enjoyed anytime between breakfast and lunch or lunch and dinner over tell a tale. There is a wide variety to choose from, from Darjeeling to Earl Grey, herbal to green tea. …

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