It's Facts, Innit! Tributes as Warren Mitchell Dies

By Moncrieff, Chris | Scotland on Sunday (Edinburgh, Scotland), November 15, 2015 | Go to article overview

It's Facts, Innit! Tributes as Warren Mitchell Dies


Moncrieff, Chris, Scotland on Sunday (Edinburgh, Scotland)


ACTOR Warren Mitchell, best known for starring as Alf Garnett, has died aged 89.

A statement from the Till Death Us Do Part star's family said: "Sadly we can confirm Warren Mitchell died in the early hours of Saturday 14 November surrounded by his family.

"He has been in poor health for some time, but was cracking jokes to the last."

Family member Jerry Barnett tweeted: "Just got the news my great uncle Warren Mitchell (aka Alf Garnett) died last night. The last of his generation, wonderful and funny man RIP."

Social media was flooded with tributes following the news of the TV star's death.

Comedian Ricky Gervais tweeted: "Alf Garnett was one of the most influential and important characters and performances in comedy history. RIP Warren Mitchell."

Theatre director Rupert Goold wrote: "RIP Warren Mitchell. A deeply soulful and erudite man who genuinely loved the theatre."

Mitchell's role as Alf Garnett was his big break, and the controversial character came to be much-loved by the British public. Off-screen, Mitchell was an ardent Tottenham Hotspur supporter, but his character Garnett was a West Ham fan.

Even 40 years after this successful and racy BBC sitcom was running, Mitchell continued to be stopped in the street by people who thought he was the working-class, anti-Semitic Tory bigot he portrayed, even though he was Jewish.

The British public warmed to Alf Garnett, probably because he could be identified with the kind of reactionary and prejudiced figure found all over the country.

Sometimes the satire of the show was lost because people regarded Garnett as a loveable old rogue whose views were quite acceptable. …

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