Cutting from Home: Tools Set Editors Free

By Valentini, Valentina | Variety, April 3, 2018 | Go to article overview

Cutting from Home: Tools Set Editors Free


Valentini, Valentina, Variety


AS WE MOVE CLOSER to a world of telecommuting and online collaboration, film editors are jumping on the bandwagon. As a group they've been traditionally somewhat removed from the day-to-day moviemaking process, working in dark suites far from the set. But it's one thing to work across town and quite another to work on a different continent.

Take Langdon Page, who has edited feature documentaries "Salinger" (2013), "Mapplethorpe: Look at the Pictures" (2016) and this year's "Inventing Tomorrow" from Chile, the South American country to which he relocated in 2011 for family reasons. (He did have to travel to Los Angeles to edit 2017's "The Final Year," about President Obama's last year in office, because it was "politically sensitive.")

"Between 2012 and now I've cut six documentaries remotely," says Page, who received a grant from the Chilean government to start a production company. "At that point, the technology was just getting to where this dream of being able to live anywhere but still work with the U.S. was becoming feasible."

Page isn't the only editor to work remotely. Individuals choose to work far from a production for various reasons. These can be as simple as wanting to be a stay-at-home parent or as complicated as facing political risks if they work in a certain country.

Stay-at-home mom and freelance editor Chloe Reynolds Gauthier lives in Maine and works on smaller narrative projects and also for digital agency Spot Creative, whose clients include Bloomberg, NYU Langone Medical Center and the National September 11 Memorial & Museum. She began as a full-time in-house editor in New York and moved to Maine for a better quality of family life.

Douglas Blush lives in Los Angeles and has been cutting films from his home for a decade. He was the consulting editor and producer on the 2018 Oscar-winning documentary "Icarus," and he won an ACE Eddie Award for the 2013 Oscar-winning doc "20 Feet From Stardom." "I've been working globally for years now," Blush says. "I have an edit and production office at home set up exactly to my liking. I'm able to work odd hours that can match to time zones around the world as needed, and often do it in my pajamas."

Remote editors frequently use Adobe Premiere Pro - a nonlinear editing soft- ? …

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Cutting from Home: Tools Set Editors Free
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