Deaf Education and Deaf Culture: Lessons from Latin America

By Lawyer, Gloshanda | American Annals of the Deaf, Winter 2018 | Go to article overview

Deaf Education and Deaf Culture: Lessons from Latin America


Lawyer, Gloshanda, American Annals of the Deaf


Deaf Education and Deaf Culture: Lessons from Latin America Change and Promise: Bilingual Deaf Education and Deaf Culture in Latin America. Barbara Gerner de García and Lodenir Becker Karnopp (Eds.). Gallaudet University Press, 2016. 240 pp. $70.00 (hardcover).

Change and Promise describes the current state of Deaf communities and deaf education across Latin America. Gerner de García and Karnopp have assembled a group of contributors whose work connects current educational practices in Latin America to historical events, international influences, power relations, and hegemonic forces within deaf education. In this review, I critique this work and provide a rationale for why it should be widely read by any professional considering the field of deaf education. Additionally, I argue that Change and Promise should be read by Deaf, DeafBlind, DeafDisabled, and Hard of Hearing individuals in celebration of the power of community movements to ignite change on local and national levels.

The preface of the book sets the tone for the content to follow. Carlos Skliar boldly and unapologetically questions the current state of bilingual deaf education, the role of educational structures, and the need to address public policy. Skliar confronts the chasm between educational policy and the educational structures around deaf children; addresses the push for normalcy, which is affecting the education of deaf children; and discusses the gap between rhetoric and implementation (i.e., the difficulties related to insufficient resources, training or its lack for Deaf adults, the push for inclusion in schools, and the lack of early intervention services). The preface raises important issues that need to be propelled to the forefront of discourses surrounding deaf education worldwide. In particular, whose rights should prevail: those of the deaf child, the hearing parents, or the professionals in the field? Are the needs of deaf children incompatible with the educational policies and structures that govern classroom and schoolwide practices? The preface is followed by a chapter that connects the fields of cultural studies, Deaf studies, educational policy, and politics. For far too long, deaf education and Deaf studies have been kept away from cultural studies, with most universities housing deaf education within special education. This has resulted in a persistent demand to make Deaf, DeafBlind, DeafDisabled, and Hard of Hearing children fit normative expectations. Most teacher preparation programs, as a result, have adopted the medical perspective on being Deaf, DeafBlind, DeafDisabled, and Hard of Hearing, and have sought to prepare professionals to repair what is deviant from the hearing norm. This is true not only of Latin American colleges and universities but of most institutions of higher education preparing teachers of the deaf around the globe.

The authors tackle all aspects of the issue at hand- specifically, hegemonic forces and the "othering" of Deaf individuals; educational policy; denial of multiple Deaf identities; connections between Deaf communities and Deaf schools; the need to train teachers, interpreters, and professionals to work in bilingual schools; and the need to expand the concept of bilingual deaf education. The discussion of the narrow focus of bilingual deaf education is of great importance. One author argues that the historical definitions and conceptualizations of bilingual deaf education have focused solely on language and on Deaf versus hearing cultures. However, Deaf culture is not simply the "inverse [with connotations of inferiority] of hearing culture"; it is not a uni- versal culture but instead is pluralistic within itself. Therefore, bilingual deaf education must include how to interact with multiple cultures and individual differences within cultures. The authors contributing to this scholarly work assert that deaf education must be rooted in what is commonly referred to as interculturalism in Latin America. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Deaf Education and Deaf Culture: Lessons from Latin America
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.