Study: Mexicans Don't Cost Jobs SMU Researchers Find Immigrants Create Employment, Bolster Texas Economy

By Alfredo Corchado Dallas Morning News | The Spokesman-Review (Spokane, WA), April 21, 2018 | Go to article overview

Study: Mexicans Don't Cost Jobs SMU Researchers Find Immigrants Create Employment, Bolster Texas Economy


Alfredo Corchado Dallas Morning News, The Spokesman-Review (Spokane, WA)


"While Mexican and American workers competed for the same jobs

during the 1987-1994 period, since NAFTA this has changed. Now both groups complement each other and act as a single production unit."

Raymond Robertson

Texas A&M University

Far from taking jobs away from Texans, Mexicans are helping create additional employment opportunities, providing valuable labor for a growing economy and helping the deepening integration with Mexico, according to the Texas-Mexico Center at Southern Methodist University.

The findings of the first research study by the center comes as the Trump administration cracks down on unauthorized immigrants, referring to them as criminals and calling for a wall between both countries. The center's study called for "freer migration" across the border and fewer barriers to international crossings, touting Texas as an example of cooperation with Mexico.

The nonpartisan Texas-Mexico Center was created in 2017 with a $4 million donation from Monterrey, Mexico-based GRUMA, and its unit, Dallas-based Mission Foods, with the goal of highlighting the deepening economic and cultural integration underway between Texas and Mexico. As many as 1 million jobs in Texas are attributed to trade with Mexico. GRUMA alone generates about 1,000 direct jobs and more than 4,500 indirect jobs in the north region.

The study relied on data from the U.S. Census Bureau and its Mexican counterpart, known as INEGI. The study, with contributions by the Bush School of Government at Texas A&M University, the Federal Reserve Board of Dallas and Colegio de Mexico in Mexico City, stressed the importance of labor from Mexico, which in many parts of the United States, is in decline.

Underscoring the trends is the 1994 North American Free Trade Agreement, or NAFTA. The trade accord led to a dramatic economic transformation that fueled a shift in goods, products and movement of people, factors that over the years have impacted cities and regions far from the 2,000-mile border. …

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