What I Learned from the Vietnam War

By Sharp, Bill | Honolulu Star - Advertiser, April 29, 2018 | Go to article overview

What I Learned from the Vietnam War


Sharp, Bill, Honolulu Star - Advertiser


NEW YORK TIMES Hundreds of people gathered at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall, for a ceremony that served as a prologue for the reading of the names of the 58,229 service members who were killed in the Vietnam War and whose names are inscribed on the wall.

April 30, 1975, marks 43 years since North Vietnamese army tanks No. 391 and No. 843 crashed through the gates of the presidential palace, bringing about the collapse of the Saigon government and the end of the Vietnam War.

As the Ken Burns and Lynn Novick’s PBS documentary, “The Vietnam War,” bore out, the war is deeply engrained in the psyche of the 2.7 million of those of us who served there, including 41,820 from Hawaii (285 lost their lives), survivors of service people killed, and all who lived through those tumultuous times.

Otherwise laid-back Hawaii saw the University of Hawaii-Manoa campus engulfed in anti-war protests. Many clearly remember evening TV news reports of the number of Americans killed in action that day and the surreal sight and sound of Huey helicopters nightly flying into their living rooms.

Perhaps the deepest scar of the Vietnam War is the everlasting division in American society that it spawned. The lesson for many was that you could no longer trust the government to tell the truth. Thus the spirit of societal consensus has yet to be recovered and the foundation of U.S. social polarization was laid.

My job was to review intelligence reports about the location and intentions of enemy troops and to identify those who were farmers by day but guerrilla fighters by night. Because of the nature of the work, I worked very closely with a Vietnamese staff of interpreters, translators, ex- Republic of Vietnam government officials, etc.

Many hours were spent talking to Vietnamese colleagues about the causes of the war, the conduct of the war, the Saigon government, U. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

What I Learned from the Vietnam War
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.