Recent Decisions: SUPREME COURT DECISIONS

Journal of Law and Education, Winter 2018 | Go to article overview

Recent Decisions: SUPREME COURT DECISIONS


Review Granted, Lower Decision Vacated, and Remanded:

DOCKET NO: 16-1533

NAME: E.F. v. Newport Mesa Unified Sch. Dist.

DATE: 10/2/2017

CITATION: - U.S. -, 86 U.S.L.W. 3126

DECISION BELOW: E.F. v. Newport Mesa Unified Sch. Dist., 684 F. App'x. 629. (9th Cir. 2017) (unpublished).

Parents of child with autism brought suit against school district under Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, Section 504 of Rehabilitation Act, Title II of Americans with Disabilities Act and California disability statutes claiming district failed to provide free appropriate public education. E.F.'s Individualized Education Plan (IEP) was modified several times from 2009 to 2013 to add new goals or allow for additional support. In 2013, E.F.'s parents requested one on one classroom support. The district refused as they considered the 2 to 1 student-teacher ratio in the classroom to be sufficient. E.F.'s parents disagreed and filed for a due process hearing. The administrative law judge found that the district should have completed an assistive technology assessment sooner and awarded twenty extra individual assistive technology training sessions to E.F., but denied all other claims. E.F.'s parents appealed to district court. The district court granted summary judgment for the school district on all claims except the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act claim. After reviewing this claim, the district court upheld the administrative law judge's findings. E.F.'s parents appealed. The court of appeals affirmed the district court's decision. E.F.'s parents requested certiorari to the United States Supreme Court. Held: Decision vacated and remanded. The U.S. Supreme Court granted certiorari, vacated the court of appeals decision and remanded the case "for further consideration in light of Endrew F. v. Douglas County School Dist. " E.F. v. Newport Mesa Unified Sch. Dist., - U.S.-, 86 U.S.L.W. 3126 (2017).

Review Denied

Decisions without published opinion in lower court

DOCKET NO: 17-386

NAME: Salazar v. S. San Antonio Indep. Sch. Dist.

DATE CERT. DENIED: 10/16/2017

CITATION: - U.S. -, 86 U.S.L.W. 3186

Student brought Title IX suit against school district, alleging he was repeatedly molested by school principal. Based on undisputed facts, a jury awarded Salazar $4,500,000. School district appealed. Held: For the district. The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals overturned the award, finding that Title IX did not impose liability on the school district when the only district employee with knowledge of the sexual abuse was the perpetrator. Salazar v. S. San Antonio Indep. Sch. Dist., 690 F. App'x 853 (5th Cir. 2017) (unpublished), cert denied, - U.S. 86 U.S.L.W. 3186 (2017).

Decisions with published opinion in lower court

DOCKET NO: 16-1405

NAME: De Vries v. Regents ofUniv. of Cal.

DATE CERT. DENIED: 10/2/2017

CITATION: - U.S. -, 86 U.S.L.W. 3139

Taxpayer brought suit seeking judgment that university's polices making undocumented immigrants eligible for education benefits were invalid. In 1996, Congress prohibited undocumented immigrants from receiving education benefits as part of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996, but §1621(d) of this statute allowed states to pass laws that would specifically allow undocumented immigrants to receive certain benefits. The California legislature passed three laws allowing qualified undocumented immigrants to receive specific postsecondary educational benefits. As the California Constitution limits the legislature's ability to regulate the University of California system, the Regents of the University of California adopted three policies to allow undocumented immigrants access to the benefits ide_72.tified in the California statutes. De Vries brought suit claiming that the policies were not state laws as defined in section §1621(d). The court found that the policies constituted state laws, but offered De Vries the opportunity to file an amended complaint. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Recent Decisions: SUPREME COURT DECISIONS
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.