Teaching and Leading in TURBULENT TIMES

By Gossart, Heather; Chavez-Kopp, Andrea | Momentum, Spring 2018 | Go to article overview

Teaching and Leading in TURBULENT TIMES


Gossart, Heather, Chavez-Kopp, Andrea, Momentum


It is not easy to be an educator. It is even harder to be a Catholic educator. We are called to be a moral compass to the young people whom God has called us to teach and lead. In these turbulent times, when we are confronted with banner headlines that scream racial, cultural and social intolerance, it is often hard to know how to have the conversations that need to be taking place in every Catholic and public classroom in the country. As educators we need to address and take ownership of the fact that racism, whether overt or subtle, is still alive and well in our educational systems ... and our Catholic institutions are not immune.

Today more than ever we need to recognize and address the ways we have allowed the racism of low expectations to exist in our classrooms. We need to acknowledge tuition structures that prevent too many students from accessing Catholic education. We need to look at the equitable distribution of our most talented and experienced teachers throughout the curriculum, rather than just teaching the upper level courses. We need to look at our disciplinary structures and ask ourselves if our students of color are more apt to be suspended or expelled than their white counterparts.

Most of all, as educators who seek to teach as Jesus did, with respect, compassion and love, we pray for the guidance to acknowledge, confront and destroy the subtle and overt forms of racism that, left unchecked, will destroy the spirit and heart of a young person. The dialogues we are called to are not easy ones; they take courage and vision and faith.

The National Catholic Educational Association (NCEA) seeks to create a learning and sharing dialogue that has the potential to cultivate the heart as well as the mind. The first step in this critical dialogue is the panel discussion taking place at the NCEA 2018 Convention and Expo, "Teaching and Leading in Turbulent Times: How to Navigate Discussions About Racism, Politics and Current Events in Your Catholic School and Diocese." The outstanding panel, chaired by the Most Reverend George V. Murry, S. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Teaching and Leading in TURBULENT TIMES
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.