'Murder Me, Monster (Muere, Monstruo, Muere)': Cannes Review

By Hunter, Allan | Screen International, May 13, 2018 | Go to article overview

'Murder Me, Monster (Muere, Monstruo, Muere)': Cannes Review


Hunter, Allan, Screen International


Dir Alejandro Fadel. Argentina. 2018. 106mins

Murder Me, Monster

Dir Alejandro Fadel. Argentina. 2018. 106mins

Alejandro Fadel wades into some dark, murky waters with Murder Me, Monster (Muere, Monstruo, Muere), a gory creature feature from the fantasy realms of Guillermo Del Toro with a nod to David Lynch along the way. Alternately intriguing, stomach-turning and mystifying, it has cult potential within a Midnight Madness-style genre audience seeking more offbeat fare.

Fadel builds suspense and fills in the eccentric character details that give the film its distinctive flavour

Writer/director Fadel (Carancho, Los Salvajes) knows how to start a story. High in the Andes mountains, a woman stumbles into view. Her throat has been cut and is starting to gape open as she places a hand on the back of her head to prevent it detaching completely. Her efforts are wasted as she becomes the first victim in a series of murders in which heads are savagely torn from bodies. Anyone of a squeamish nature has certainly had fair warning of what is to come.

The investigation falls to rural police officer Cruz (Victor Lopez), and suspicion eventually falls on local resident David (Esteban Bigliardi). David claims to hear voices. Certain phrases and images tend to make him feel more aggressive. He believes that a monster is using telepathy to communicate through him. Are these the ravings of an unhinged mind or is there really a hideous monster on the loose in the mountains?

Fadel keeps you wanting to discover the answer as he builds suspense and fills in the eccentric character details that give the film its distinctive flavour. Cruz is a lugubrious figure with a reputation for his nifty dance moves. …

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