Man Who Lost Family Members in Holocaust Opposes Nazi Artifact Sales

By Tutton, Michael | The Canadian Press, May 28, 2018 | Go to article overview

Man Who Lost Family Members in Holocaust Opposes Nazi Artifact Sales


Tutton, Michael, The Canadian Press


Halifax man opposes sale of Nazi artifacts

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HALIFAX - A Halifax man who lost family members in the Holocaust says he's hoping a local antique shop will voluntarily stop selling Nazi artifacts -- while a national Jewish group has called for regulation on trade in Third Reich memorabilia.

Shimon Walt said he learned of the sale of Nazi party badges and photos of Nazi-era war medals from his wife, Peggy Walt, who visited the shop after attending synagogue nearby on Saturday.

"I wish those memorabilia, all the swastikas and photographs ... would stay locked up in museums around the world in places where we can educate our young ones and ourselves not to forget what has happened," Walt, a cellist who plays in the local symphony orchestra, said in an interview on Monday.

Walt's mother Bela survived the Holocaust in Lithuania after she and her mother were transferred to a Siberian work camp.

Peggy Walt said when they returned from the camp, his relatives in the city of Vilnius had disappeared.

She said some died in a nearby killing pit where Jews were taken and shot, while others were shipped to death camps operated by the German state. His mother and grandmother eventually moved to Israel, where Shimon was educated prior to coming to the United States and then Nova Scotia.

The musician said he doesn't, at this point, favour laws that ban the sale of memorabilia, but prefers that shop owners and flea markets voluntarily cease the trade and sale of the items -- and that their use be restricted for educational purposes.

He said he is hoping shop owners consider the sense of hurt that occurs for descendants of Holocaust survivors.

"These are likely some of the last symbols some of my relatives saw before they died," he said.

Jack Craft, the owner of Finer Things Antiques and Curios, said in a social media post that he agreed "the swastika is considered an offensive symbol," but he also said customers who purchase the items are often doing so due to an interest in military history," and "collect historical artifacts to preserve and to study."

"I respect your opinion, and ask you to try to understand how and why some people may be collectors. For many, it's a lifelong scholarship and interest in learning about an important time in world history," he wrote during an online discussion involving a number of participants. …

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