Sports Betting Is Rightly for States to Decide

By Morgan, Joseph | AZ Daily Star, June 3, 2018 | Go to article overview

Sports Betting Is Rightly for States to Decide


Morgan, Joseph, AZ Daily Star


The Supreme Court's recent decision to overturn a federal law that banned sports betting in all states except Nevada is a win for the Constitution, plain and simple.

The court rightly returned the authority to individual states that had been usurped by Congress's 1992 law "regulating" the commerce of gambling.

A recent poll showed that Arizonans are open to the idea of being able to wager money on professional and college sports events legally, and Arizona legislatures seem intent on pursuing this new opportunity to raise revenues from the industry.

Whether or not this is a good thing for our state remains an open question, but one thing is certain -- it is ours to make.

In the ruling handed down nearly three weeks ago, the justices declared, "Congress can regulate sports gambling directly, but if it elects not to do so, each State is free to act on its own."

"Our job is to interpret the law Congress has enacted and decide whether it is consistent with the Constitution. PASPA is not."

If the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act (PASPA) had actually been written properly, it would have established regulatory rules governing any aspects of sports gambling related to interstate commerce, an authority Congress has been granted by the Constitution.

Instead, Congress placed a blanket ban on sports betting, except for Nevada -- one wonders who benefited from that deal -- and in so doing not only acted unconstitutionally but took away the ability of states to decide for themselves on the issue.

Our nation's supreme law is the Constitution, and it is frustrating when members of Congress -- those elected to pass laws on our behalf that are in keeping with Constitution --willfully violate their sworn duty to uphold the Constitution! How much revenue was lost to states that may have wanted to pursue establishing a means to regulate gaming in their states?

For nearly 26 years, Nevada has been the only state allowed to offer a full menu of sports betting options. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Sports Betting Is Rightly for States to Decide
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.