Introducing QMCRLE, the Queen Mary Centre for Religion and Literature in English

By Whitehouse, Tessa | Bunyan Studies, January 1, 2016 | Go to article overview

Introducing QMCRLE, the Queen Mary Centre for Religion and Literature in English


Whitehouse, Tessa, Bunyan Studies


In January 2016, a new research initiative was established at Queen Mary University of London. The Queen Mary Centre for Religion and Literature in English (QMCRLE for short) seeks to develop scholarly understanding of religion from around 1500 to the present. Our work emphasizes historical and literary approaches to religion, including religious writing in many forms, and investigations of the meaning and practice and religion (specifically Christianity and Judaism) over the longue durée.

The membership of QMCRLE is diverse. The organisers belong to the History and English departments at QMUL. Associates and Visiting Fellows from local and international institutions contribute to our research culture by working on QMCRLE projects, speaking at our events, and publishing with us. Our regular events are open to all and details can be found on the QMCRLE website. These events include fortnightly research-in-progress lunchtime sessions and the Seminar in Religion and Literature, which runs each summer. In 2016 we welcomed Alison Searle (Sydney), Cecilia Muratori (Warwick), and Veronica O'Mara (Hull) to present research. At the lunchtime sessions we discussed readings by Friedrich Schleiermacher and Talal Asad and commented on research ranging from William James to early modern typography.

One of QMCRLE's unique contributions to research culture is that the website acts as a hub for projects which are all freely available to the public. At present these include transcriptions of primary materials such as the letters of Joseph Priestley and Theophilus Lindsey and writings of Henry Crabb Robinson, the prosopographical resources A Biographical Dictionary of Tutors at the Dissenters ' Private Academies, and the databases Dissenting Academies Online and Who Were the Nuns? It is also the home of the scholarly journal Enlightenment and Dissent. There are many more materials and resources available on the website, so please do browse the site: http://www.qmulreligionandliterature.co.uk/.

Two highlights of the first year may be of particular interest to readers of Bunyan Studies. The first is our inaugural research workshop. …

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