A Short History German Identification and Influence Surpass Political Boundaries

By Cooper, Brian | Telegraph - Herald (Dubuque), June 7, 2018 | Go to article overview

A Short History German Identification and Influence Surpass Political Boundaries


Cooper, Brian, Telegraph - Herald (Dubuque)


T

H

Ere was more to Germany than meets today's eye.

Even factoring in East Germany, which existed only from 1949 to 1990, today's Germany is a relatively recent creation - and smaller than its former influence and impact on Europe.

A great many people who lived outside current political boundaries of Germany were part of the mix. They and many of their ancestors consider themselves "German."

For some nine centuries, from 962 until its dissolution in 1806, the territory was controlled by the Holy Roman Empire and known as the Kingdom of Germany.

In 1815, at the Congress of Vienna, 39 German-speaking states formed the German Confederation in a bid to coordinate their economies. The long roster included Austria, Bavaria, Prussia, Saxony, Luxembourg, Liechtenstein and Bohemia.

The confederation collapsed in the late 1840s, revived in 1850 but disappeared for good in 1866, to be replaced by the German Empire in 1871 after the defeat of Napoleon in the Franco-Prussian War.

"Prussia was the leading territory that oversaw and carried out the unification of Germany," said Adam Stanley, history professor and department chair at University of Wisconsin-Platteville. "The name everybody associates with that process is Otto Von Bismarck," the chancellor of Prussia.

"For centuries, there were a lot of territories in Central Europe that we would just loosely identify as Germanic," Stanley said, explaining that the identification could be tied to language, culture or other considerations. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

A Short History German Identification and Influence Surpass Political Boundaries
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.