Outcomes of an Academic Scholarship Program at the City University of New York – New York City College of Technology

By Jang, Sunghoon | Journal of STEM Education : Innovations and Research, April-June 2018 | Go to article overview

Outcomes of an Academic Scholarship Program at the City University of New York – New York City College of Technology


Jang, Sunghoon, Journal of STEM Education : Innovations and Research


Introduction

Engineering the Future: Pathways to Success for Women and Underrepresented Students In the Engineering Technologies Is a National Science Foundation (NSF) Scholarship-STEM (S-STEM) funded project that began In Fall 2012 and was designed to support a scholarship program for thirty academically promising but financially disadvantaged students, with particular consideration given to female students In the City Tech. Associate and Bachelor degree programs In four departments at the College are listed In Table 1 below:

In order to carefully monitor the progress of the scholarship recipients and the Impact of the program, the College included a detailed assessment plan that was Implemented throughout the duration of the grant award. These assessment tasks Included building a project database that maintained scholarship Information (amount, duration, and recipients), academic progress records, participation In cohort activities, academic support Interventions for Individual recipients, and workplace internships.

Program Objectives

The College's NSF S-STEM grant award, Engineering the Future, was administered with the objectives to serve the students participating in four eligible STEM programs at the college:

Project Objective 1: To Identify and recruit NSF SSTEM scholarship applicants from a large diverse pool of academically talented entering, continuing, and transfer students at the associate and baccalaureate levels, with an emphasis on attracting eligible female candidates.

Project Objective 2: To select, enroll, and maintain a steady cohort of 30 full-time NSF S-STEM scholars on the basis of financial need and academic promise In Departments of Computer Engineering Technology, Computer Systems Technology, Electrical and Telecomm. Engineering Technology, and Mechanical Engineering Technology.

Project Objective 3: To Increase numbers of female students, a severely underrepresented population in engineering technology programs at City Tech, who are pursuing degrees in the targeted technology departments by 25% over four years.

Project Objective 4: To enable 80% of NSF S-STEM Scholars to persist in their studies to the following year.

Project Objective 5: To graduate more NSF S-STEM Scholars pursuing an Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) in the selected program degree in two years, an increase 20% over degree completion rates of other students in the School of Technology and Design.

Project Objective 6: To graduate more S-STEM Scholars pursuing a Bachelor's of Technology (B.Tech.) degree in four years, an increase of 20% over other students, to degree completion in School of Technology and Design.

Project Objective 7: To provide NSF S-STEM Scholars a comprehensive matrix of academic and personal support that includes peer mentoring, tutoring, counseling, outreach, advisement, research and internship opportunities, First-Year Learning Communities, and peer-led team learning (PLTL) for the NSF S-STEM recipients by PI and four co-PIs, Placement Office, Financial Aid Office, Student Services, and Enrollment Management staff.

Project Objective 8: To involve all NSF S-STEM Scholars in research seminars/conferences, field trips, and poster presentations in order to develop their research interests and convey the excitement of "doing" science and technology.

Project Objective 9: To monitor and evaluate through formative and summative evaluation activities in coordination with the Office of Assessment and Institutional Research (AIR) the effectiveness of the proposed activities in increasing enrollment, persistence, academic success, and graduation rates of NSF S-STEM scholarship recipients.

Research Design

Research Background

Student retention and persistence in engineering education have received much academic attention in recent years, with researchers examining the challenges that engineering students face in navigating the undergraduate academic system and the barriers in engineering education (Gill, Sharp. …

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