Why Management Academics Matter

By Bothello, Joel; Professor, Assistant et al. | The Canadian Press, June 20, 2018 | Go to article overview

Why Management Academics Matter


Bothello, Joel, Professor, Assistant, John Molson School of Business, Concordia University and Thomas Roulet, Lecturer, Senior, King's College London, The Canadian Press


Why management academics matter

--

This article was originally published on The Conversation, an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts. Disclosure information is available on the original site.

___

Authors: Joel Bothello, Assistant Professor in Strategy and Sustainability, John Molson School of Business, Concordia University and Thomas Roulet, Senior Lecturer, King's College London

Across a variety of professions, many high-achieving people report the feeling that their accomplishments are the result of luck and contingency rather than individual skill and merit.

The identification of this "impostor syndrome" dates back to the 1970s, although its prevalence today is hardly surprising given the unprecedented specialization and explosion of technology at work.

In a recent essay in the Journal of Management Studies, we outline how the impostor syndrome is especially pervasive in one occupation: Management professors.

Management is a fairly recent social science, but for a number of reasons, academics in this field are particularly challenged by students, peers and fellow social scientists.

On a broader level, the added value of business school is itself being questioned. What impact would that have on aspiring academics?

Management: A young, interdisciplinary field

Compared with related fields like sociology, economics or psychology, management is a relatively new field -- the Academy of Management, the biggest academic association in management, was established between the two world wars.

Since that time, though, management has become well-defined and rigorous area of study and research, with scholars publishing not only in their own fields, but also other social science journals, including the prestigious American Sociological Review or the American Economic Review. They have even published in more generalist journals like Science and Nature.

Management research, by nature, is interdisciplinary, drawing from multiple fields in humanities and social sciences and often bringing them together to generate novel contributions to research.

Skepticism abounds

However, other social scientists still hold the bias that management is not a legitimate scientific field. Our experiences suggest that people, in general, do not give much credit to academic work in management, simply because it is most commonly (and prejudicially) considered as something that is practised rather than researched.

The incredulity extends to other audiences as well. When teaching in business schools, management scholars are exposed to students who are in the classroom because they want to enhance their performance or credentials in the business world.

That means management academics are often teaching executives who sometimes have a decade or more experience than they do. The challenge is convincing those executives that researchers have something to offer in a field in which they have less practical experience -- or in some cases, none at all.

Internal challenges

Despite being less recognized as a science than parallel fields, management scholarship has rapidly become hyper-competitive for junior scholars -- the requirements to get a tenure-track job or tenure in the field have exploded. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Why Management Academics Matter
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.