Health Insurance Remains an Issue for Students and Recent Grads

By Pennamon, Tiffany | Diverse Issues in Higher Education, June 28, 2018 | Go to article overview

Health Insurance Remains an Issue for Students and Recent Grads


Pennamon, Tiffany, Diverse Issues in Higher Education


The summer months and the period following graduation can leave some college students and recent graduates scrambling to find affordable, yearround health insurance if they lack coverage under a school or parents health plan.

A nationwide poll by AgileHealthInsurance.com revealed that more than 70 percent of college students and recent graduates reported having difficulty finding affordable insurance coverage. Many students cited expensive premiums and high out-of-pocket costs as impediments to affordability.

"Uninsured students and graduates face significant and enduring education-related costs and, as a direct result, have very limited budgets for health insurance coverage," said Bruce Telkamp, founder and chief executive officer of AgileHealthInsurance. com. "Our research in this area has consistently shown that unless they can find major medical insurance for under $100 per month, most will forgo health coverage and become uninsured."

For the nearly four million students graduating from higher education institutions and the 20 million students on their summer break, the cost of health insurance can be a burden, particularly for low-income students or graduates who face impending student loan repayments, the company said. The penalty for not having health insurance in 2018 is 2.5 percent of household income or $695 per adult, whichever amount is higher.

AgileHealthInsurance.com is a company that educates consumers on the availability of private market health insurance options that are alternatives to Affordable Care Act plans. The company markets short-term health insurance plans as an "optimal" and affordable choice for students lacking coverage during the summer months or for graduates waiting for job-based benefits to begin.

However, health insurance policy experts recommend that students or recent graduates select an insurance plan based on their available financial resources and a plan's coverage.

"Insurance and medical care is expensive, and so having these income-related programs that can help lower those costs is really critical," said Dr. Linda J. Blumberg, an Institute Fellow in the Health Policy Center at the Urban Institute.

Low-income students may benefit from insurance options through Medicaid as many states have expanded their eligibility requirements. Currently, 33 states and the District of Columbia have expanded Medicaid to low-income residents.

"A lot of students might be surprised to learn that if they're on their own - they're not a dependent of their parent anymore - they might be eligible for Medicaid depending on what state they're in," said Sabrina Corlette, a research professor at the Center on Health Insurance Reforms at Georgetown University's Health Policy Institute.

"Medicaid is not just a more affordable option for students, but [it is] much more generous and comprehensive in coverage than what you might be able to get under a student health plan," Corlette added. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Health Insurance Remains an Issue for Students and Recent Grads
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.