Garden Glory Morning Glory Inn's Courtyard Garden Gives Tour-Goers a Southern Welcome

By Kirkland, Kevin | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA), July 15, 2018 | Go to article overview

Garden Glory Morning Glory Inn's Courtyard Garden Gives Tour-Goers a Southern Welcome


Kirkland, Kevin, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)


In the 1860s and '70s, John G. Fisher's courtyard garden earned its keep as a showcase for the German immigrant's handmade bricks and pavers. Later, it was a utilitarian space where the Stokus family raised fowl for duck soup. Today, the shady space works as the reception area for weddings and events at the Morning Glory Inn on the South Side.

From 11 a.m.-4 p.m. July 22, the inn and its garden will be one of eight stops on the fifth annual South Side Garden Tour. Tour tickets are $20 and VIP tickets are $40. VIP tickets include the tour, a reception afterward with hor d'oeuvres, wine, music by Cello Fury and a talk on summer gardening by Doug Oster of Everybody Gardens. The tour is organized by the South Side Community Council. Proceeds support the Esser Plaza Revitalization Project.

Inn owner Dave Eshelman said tour-goers will get a taste of what it's like to be a guest at the 30-35 weddings held at the inn each year. Couples often exchange vows beneath an iron arch covered with climbing hydrangea. Their guests have full use of the 1862-built house and ancient courtyard with bricks laid in a herringbone pattern. It reminds many visitors of the historic gardens of New Orleans, Savannah, Ga., and Charleston, S.C.

Just swap the mint juleps for champagne, beer, wine and gin and tonics.

"It's an eating, talking, flowing party inside and out," said Mr. Eshelman, who opened the inn in 1996 and hosted its first wedding reception in 1999. He guesses the inn, with its five guestrooms and separate bridal suite in an 1872 row house, has hosted more than 500 weddings.

"The garden evolved with the inn. It has become a huge part of it," he said.

The flowering vine that gave the Morning Glory Inn its name was one of the few plants growing there when Mr. Eshelman and his then-wife, Nancy, finished restoring the house and opened the city's third bed-and-breakfast 21 years ago.

Other holdovers are a red rhododendron and a silver maple tree that now towers over the courtyard.

The Eshelmans added a redbud tree, more antique wrought-iron fencing and curving raised flower beds that now hold begonias, phlox, azaleas, polka dot plants and other annuals and perennials. Palms in large containers and Virginia creeper on the surrounding brick walls add a Southern flavor. Brittany Danford is the staff gardener and most of the plants come from Chapon's Greenhouse in Baldwin Borough.

Other picturesque details include an antique iron gate from West Virginia, an old garden shed, a lighted stone fountain made by Eichenlaub and a gazebo that houses the outdoor bar. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Garden Glory Morning Glory Inn's Courtyard Garden Gives Tour-Goers a Southern Welcome
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.