New Education Philosophy School of Phish Course Culminates in Trip to the Gorge

By Podplesky, Azaria | The Spokesman-Review (Spokane, WA), July 20, 2018 | Go to article overview

New Education Philosophy School of Phish Course Culminates in Trip to the Gorge


Podplesky, Azaria, The Spokesman-Review (Spokane, WA)


If you go

Phish

When: 7:30 p.m. today through Sunday

Where: The Gorge Amphitheatre, 754 Silica Road NW, George, Washington.

Cost: $75/general admission; $200/three-day ticket. Tickets available through Ticketmaster.

Not every college course gives students the opportunity to discuss philosophy, one of America's most esteemed bands and the connections between the two, but not every college course is Philosophy School of Phish.

Stephanie Jenkins, assistant professor of philosophy in the School of History, Philosophy and Religion at Oregon State University, started the class in 2014 as a way to explore philosophical concepts as they relate to the band, its music and its fans.

"Usually as a philosopher, if you go to a social event and you tell people you're a philosophy professor, it's a conversation stopper," she said. "At Phish shows, it's a conversation starter ... It's a community where there's this strong undercurrent of philosophical dialogue that I think is really conducive to this kind of work."

This term's course culminates in a trip to the Gorge Amphitheatre for the band's trio of shows today through Sunday.

Phish - guitarist/vocalist Trey Anastasio, drummer Jon Fishman, bassist/vocalist Mike Gordon and keyboardist/vocalist Page McConnell - formed in Vermont in 1983.

Jenkins became a fan after hearing the band's 1995 live album "A Live One."

"I, before listening to this album, primarily listened to classic rock music and what I love about Phish is that it combines all of my favorite musical influences into very powerful, creative, improvisational rock music," she said.

Jenkins estimates she's seen the band between 125 and 150 times, including following the band's summer tour around the country in 2014.

Jenkins got into philosophy around the same time she got into Phish and said both influences developed alongside one another.

She got the idea for the Philosophy School of Phish course in grad school where she heard about a professor who was rumored to be the band philosopher for R.E.M.

"As soon as I heard that, I was like 'That's a thing? You can be a band philosopher? How do I do that?' " Jenkins said.

Her first year at Oregon State University, Jenkins pitched the idea for her course to friends and colleagues, who suggested she talk to her school's director.

He sent her to the dean, and in 2014, Philosophy School of Phish, more formally called Philosophy of Art and Music, launched as an online class.

The class is taught online because requiring students to be in Corvallis for the summer would prevent them from attending live Phish shows, and the e-campus allows non-OSU students to enroll in the course.

This term, there are 15 students in the class. Jenkins said every year there are one to three non-OSU students who enrolled because they are fans of the band, and the rest of the class is evenly divided between students who have never heard of Phish and those who may have heard a song or two but don't consider themselves fans.

"It creates an interesting community in the class," Jenkins said. "The students that are fans take on a role of introducing the bands to the students that aren't familiar with it. But the course material's all written from the perspective of assuming the students aren't going to have a working knowledge of the band. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

New Education Philosophy School of Phish Course Culminates in Trip to the Gorge
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.