A Rubric to Assess the Teaching Competency Using Motor Skills and Body Language Games: Initial Development and Validation

By Capella-Peris, Carlos; Gil-Gómez, Jesús et al. | Journal of Physical Education and Sport, June 2018 | Go to article overview

A Rubric to Assess the Teaching Competency Using Motor Skills and Body Language Games: Initial Development and Validation


Capella-Peris, Carlos, Gil-Gómez, Jesús, Chiva-Bartoll, Òscar, Journal of Physical Education and Sport


Introduction

The interest in competency-based education and training arose in the 1960s and 1970s as a result of several publications about organisational and teacher training programmes in the United States (Biemans, Nieuwenhuis, Poell, Mulder, & Wesselink, 2004). The growing importance of information, communication technology, and globalisation have heightened interest in competency-based education as a leading paradigm for innovation (Dochy & Nickmans, 2005).

Improving the Teaching Competency of Pre-service Teachers (PTs) is a critical element of initial teacher education programmes (Cheng, 2014). This competency is related to the acquisition and development of adequate skills, knowledge, attitudes, and experience to successfully perform professional teaching duties (McNamara, 1992). Teaching practices must be decisive to ensure the accurate development of Teaching Competency (Struyven, Blieck, & De Roeck, 2014); thus, most training programmes for PTs develop this competency through mandatory teaching practices. Darling-Hammond (2006) identified distinctive features that enable PTs to confront the challenges of teaching practices and to develop their Teaching Competency. The assessment of teaching performance involves the implementation of specific materials during evaluation processes; however, the reliable assessment of competency can be difficult due to the use of holistic approaches, specific nature of teaching, and the integration of knowledge, skills, and attitudes (Tigelaar, Dolmans, Wolfhagen, & Van der Vleuten, 2005).

Research on teacher training has revealed that teaching assessment offers meaningful learning experiences to teachers who take part in this process (Uhlenbeck, Verloop, & Beijaard, 2002). There is great teaching and learning value in these practices for PTs, and their training education should include assessments of several teaching activities. These practices should be focused not only on the assessment of their peers as teachers but also on their own performance. The tool proposed here is useful for assessing the Teaching Competency of PTs in Physical Education (PE) and to provide them with unique learning experiences. Very few studies have analysed the promotion of Teaching Competency in PE. We can highlight a research that examined the perspectives of Slovenian PE teachers to assess their current and desired professional competencies (Kovač, Sloan, & Starc, 2008) and a comparative analysis of PE competencies among PTs in Poland (Buchta, 2012). Hence, research is crucial to advancing in this meaningful field, which is the goal of this paper.

Teaching strategies in PE commonly include games to promote learning in childhood education (Bühler, 1924; Caillois, 1961; Château, 1950; Claparéde, 1931; Elkonin, 1978; Gross, 1902; Huizinga, 1949; Moyles, 1989; Parlebas, 1986; Piaget, 1959). There is evidence that childhood is the optimal period in life for the promotion and development of coordinative motor skills (Bernstein, 1989; Hirtz & Starosta, 2002). Thus, it is crucial to ensure correct implementation of motor skills and body language games in childhood PE to develop children's motor skills. The proposed instrument specifically assesses the Teaching Competency of PE PTs while performing motor skills and body language games in childhood education. Few studies have addressed the development of children's motor skills throughout PE training and the effectiveness of related programmes, in terms of content, context, and teaching modality (Cothran, 2001). For example, during a nine-year period, a study of the effects of physical activity on motor skills and educational achievement in PEH was conducted to examine students' perceptions of physical, cognitive, and social involvement in physical activity lessons delivered in different teaching styles (Ericsson, 2011; Sanchez, Byra, & Wallhead, 2012) or through schoolbased interventions to improve health and fitness among children (McMurray et al. …

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