An Introduction to Canadian Firearm Ownership Laws

By Goffin, Peter | The Canadian Press, July 24, 2018 | Go to article overview

An Introduction to Canadian Firearm Ownership Laws


Goffin, Peter, The Canadian Press


A primer on Canadian gun ownership laws

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TORONTO - A look at firearm regulations in Canada:

Types of firearms

Canadian law separates guns into three different categories: non-restricted, restricted and prohibited. A licence, obtained through a process that includes background checks and safety training, is needed to own any type of gun in Canada.

Non-restricted guns include regular rifles and shotguns.

Prohibited guns, which include automatic weapons as well as sawed-off shotguns and rifles under a certain length, handguns under a certain length and handguns that fire 25- or 32-calibre bullets, can be possessed by licensed owners who acquired them before current laws came into place. Those dates vary depending on the type of gun. There are some exceptions, however, such as guns made before 1946 and registered on Dec. 1, 1998.

Restricted firearms include any non-prohibited handgun, any gun that can still be fired when folded or telescoped below a certain length, and any semi-automatic gun with a barrel shorter than 470 mm and the capability of shooting centrefire bullets -- a type of ammunition that is fired by striking a firing pin or hammer against a cap or primer at the centre of the bullet's base.

You must have a licence to possess or acquire a restricted gun or its ammunition. You must also register your restricted gun and have it "verified" by RCMP-approved experts.

Gun licences

You have to be at least 18 years old to get a full Possession and Acquisition Licence for restricted firearms.

People under 18 can, however, use a restricted gun if they are under the "direct and immediate supervision" of an adult who has a licence, while kids aged 12 to 17 can get a Minors' Licence to borrow a non-restricted rifle or shotgun for activities like hunting or target shooting.

You need a licence to possess a firearm, even if you are not the gun's owner and have never handled it, the RCMP says.

You must have your firearms licence and registration certificate on hand any time you have your restricted gun with you. If a peace officer asks you for your documents and you cannot produce them, they are authorized to seize your gun.

How to qualify for a licence

To get a firearms licence you have to participate in the Canadian Restricted Firearms Safety Course, which covers basic safety practices, handgun operation and firing techniques, and how to safely handle, store, display and transport restricted guns. Licence applicants have to pass multiple tests to complete the Safety Course. …

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