Deconstructing Masculinist Power Politics in Society: Oppression, Control, and Domination

By Mihăilă, Ramona; Kovacova, Maria et al. | Contemporary Readings in Law and Social Justice, January 1, 2018 | Go to article overview

Deconstructing Masculinist Power Politics in Society: Oppression, Control, and Domination


Mihăilă, Ramona, Kovacova, Maria, Kliestikova, Jana, Kliestik, Tomas, Kubala, Pavol, Contemporary Readings in Law and Social Justice


1.Introduction

Masculinism is a rationale, rhetoric, actuation, and moral representation that preserves and adapts astute and definite kinds of ascendancy (Argenton, 2017; Flegar, 2016), being an intrinsic mindset or totalizing perspective that essentially universalizes and shows partiality towards the attributes of masculinity, thus subordinating substitute manners of comprehension, learning, and being. (Nicholas and Agius, 2018)

2.Literature Review

Gender identity is not the outcome of a particular antecedent that subsequently becomes permanent, but is transacted in a continuing process. The politics of masculinity is a debated sphere of power repositionings and counteractions (Balica, 2017; Gavurova, Tkacova, and Tucek, 2017; Ionescu, 2017a,b; Meilă, 2018; Peters and Besley, 2017; Stoian and Drumea, 2017), rather than being defined as a predetermined series of power relations. Men obtain access to command not due to their structure, but via their cultural connection with masculinity, whose traits are firmly related to power and not to men intrinsically. Hegemonic masculinity is prevalent in a somewhat variable process of gender arrangements and affinities (the architecture of masculinities and masculine rankings is an evolving, flexible, and manifold process). The effectiveness of gendered divisions and the manner in which approaches of masculinization and feminization operate to further disparities between the sexes (Bereketeab, 2017; Giroux, 2017; Klierova and Kutik, 2017; Nica, 2017a,b; Popescu and Alpopi, 2017; Syme, 2017) are identifiable in the gendered distribution of labor. "Masculine" and "feminine" attributes reinforce the gulf between remunerated work and uncompensated domestic labor, and configure the discrimination of employment into chiefly male and female positions or categories within a job. Prevalent masculinities are ceaselessly being contested, refashioned, and revitalized in various segments of society, adjusting themselves to unstable economic, political, and social contexts. (Hooper, 2012)

3.Methodology

Using data from ESA, Ipsos, McKinsey Quarterly, ONS, Pew Research Center, and Statista, we performed analyses and made estimates regarding the constitution and preservation of gender bias in the workplace. …

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