Medical Students in Limbo as Young Immigrant Program Ends

By Tareen, Sophia | The Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education, November/December 2017 | Go to article overview

Medical Students in Limbo as Young Immigrant Program Ends


Tareen, Sophia, The Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education


CHICAGO (AP) - Medical student Alejandra Duran Arreola dreams of becoming an OB-GYN in her home state of Georgia, where there's a shortage of doctors and one of the highest maternal mortality rates in the U.S.

But the 26-year-old Mexican immigrant's goal is now trapped in the debate over a program protecting hundreds of thousands of immigrants like her from deportation. Whether she becomes a doctor depends on whether Congress finds an alternative to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program that President Donald Trump phased out in September.

Arreola, who was brought to the U.S. illegally at age 14, is among about 100 medical students nationwide who are enrolled in DACA, and many have become a powerful voice in the immigration debate. Their stories have resonated with leaders in Washington. Having excelled in school and gained admission into competitive medical schools, they're on the verge of starting residencies to treat patients, a move experts say could help address the nation's worsening doctor shortage.

"It's mostly a tragedy of wasted talent and resources," said Mark Kuczewski, who leads the medical education department at Loyola University's medical school, where Arreola is in her second year. "Our country will have said, 'You cannot go treat patients.'"

The Chicago-area medical school was the first to openly accept DACA students and has the largest concentration nationwide at 32. California and New York also have significant populations, according to the Association of American Medical Colleges.

DACA gives protection to about 800,000 immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children and who otherwise would lack legal permission to be in the country. The immigrants must meet strict criteria to receive two-year permits that shield them from deportation and allow them to work.

Then-President Barack Obama created DACA in 2012. Critics call it an illegal amnesty program that is taking jobs from U.S. citizens. In rescinding it in September, Trump gave lawmakers until March to come up with a replacement.

Public support for DACA is wide. A recent poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research showed that just 1 in 5 Americans want to deport DACA recipients.

Medical students such as Arreola are trying to shape the debate, and they have the backing of influential medical groups, including the American Medical Association.

Arreola took a break from her studies in September to travel to Washington with fellow Loyola medical student and DACA recipient Cesar Montolongo Hernandez to talk to stakeholders. In their meetings with lawmakers, they framed the program as a medical necessity but also want a solution for others with DACA.

A 2017 report by the Association of American Medical Colleges predicts a shortfall of between about 35,000 and 83,000 doctors in 2025. …

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