Yellow Jackets, Hornets, Wasps on Hunt for Sugar - at Our Picnics

By Munts, Pat | The Spokesman-Review (Spokane, WA), August 16, 2018 | Go to article overview

Yellow Jackets, Hornets, Wasps on Hunt for Sugar - at Our Picnics


Munts, Pat, The Spokesman-Review (Spokane, WA)


Gardening

It's yellow jacket and wasp season and they seem to be particularly annoying this year. Even the firefighters out on the wildfire lines are being painfully plagued by them.

Yellow jackets seem to be the biggest problem right now but hornets and paper wasps aren't far behind. Yellow jackets are mostly black with distinctive yellow stripes on their abdomens. They are ground and cavity nesters who move into old rodent holes or wall cavities. As a result, their nests are often hard to detect and even harder to get rid of.

In the fall, yellow jacket nests die off save for the queen who overwinters and begins looking for a new nest site in early spring. Through the spring the new yellow jackets are busy catching other insects to provide protein to the larvae. In this way, they are a beneficial insect in the garden. In late summer, the nests stop growing and the yellow jackets start looking for sugars at, where else, our picnics. Most flowers have finished blooming and water sources are drying up in the heat, so we become the source of last resort.

Hornets and paper wasps exhibit basically the same behavior. Hornets are larger than yellow jackets and tend to be black with white stripes. They build large, papery, cone-shaped nests from eves or tree branches. Paper wasps have a large abdomen attached to the thorax by a long, thin waist. Their nests are open bottomed umbrellas attached to a limb or eve by a thin stalk. You can easily observe them coming and going.

All of them but particularly yellow jackets and wasps will vigorously defend their nests. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Yellow Jackets, Hornets, Wasps on Hunt for Sugar - at Our Picnics
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.