Hundreds Will Bicycle, Walk in Milford to Benefit Mental Health Services

By McLoughlin, Pam | New Haven Register (New Haven, CT), September 13, 2018 | Go to article overview

Hundreds Will Bicycle, Walk in Milford to Benefit Mental Health Services


McLoughlin, Pam, New Haven Register (New Haven, CT)


MILFORD — More than 300 people will be riding bicycles or walking in the annual Ride and Step Forward Memorial Walk fundraisers Sunday to benefit Bridges Healthcare mental health and addiction recovery services.

For many who participate, it’s a labor of love, because they have lost someone been touched in some way by suicide, overdose or addiction.

“I walk because my cousin struggled with mental health his whole life and was unable to find a resource to truly help him,” Morgan Pierpont of West Haven said in a news release from Bridges. “He tragically lost his life on his 21st birthday which created traumatic stress in many of my relatives.”

Pierpont said the family found Bridges after her cousin’s death and have used them as a healing resource and now advocate for those who struggle with mental health problems.

Cyclist Tammy Petrucelli, who has been riding in Folks on Spokes for more than a dozen years, said, “The event is an opportunity to do something fun, and to come together to bring awareness to the importance of talking about mental health.”

Cyclists will ride 5-, 10-, 20- and 40-mile routes — or any combination — along the shoreline, and walkers will participate in a scenic 5K route.

Registration for the events begins at 7:30 a.m., the ride begins at 8:40 a.m. and the walk begins at 10 a.m. It all starts at Fowler Field, 1 Shipyard Lane, behind the library, where there also will be a remembrance ceremony at 9:45 a.m. to honor and remember loved ones who were lost to suicide, overdose or any mental health and addiction-related disorder.

The ceremony will include a display of pictures of the individual being remembered along with three attributes that the loved one left behind and would want the world to know about them.

Pre-registration fees are $40 per cyclist, $25 per walker and $15 for all youth (ages 5 to 17) and include a free event T-shirt and refreshments. …

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